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CSM Gender Report

How Stereotypes in Movies and on TV Impact Kids’ Development [downloadable]

CSM Gender ReportA new Common Sense Media study shows that learning gender roles from movies and TV shows has real consequences on kids’ self-esteem, relationships, and even their future careers.

The Common Sense Media report, Watching Gender: How Stereotypes in Movies and on TV Impact Kids’ Development analyzes more than 150 articles, interviews, books, and other social-scientific research and finds that gender stereotypes in movies and on TV shows are widespread and very influential — teaching children what the culture expects of boys and girls. According to the report, a lifetime of viewing stereotypical media becomes so ingrained it can ultimately affect kids’ career choices, self-worth, relationships, and ability to achieve their full potential. Read more »

moody teen

Top 10 Tips for Talking to Your Teen

moody teenTeenagers are known for being moody, irritable and stressed out. Just watch any old episode of Gossip Girl, Gilmore Girls or Glee. Trying to get through to your teen can feel about as productive as trying to get your houseplant to empty the dishwasher. The teen-parent relationship is often a power struggle: a seemingly perpetual game of tug-o-war. You want to be supportive, loving and open while simultaneously trying to enforce cell phone limitations and curfews. Meanwhile, your once kind and courteous child is asserting himself in a way that makes you wonder whether, in your years of parenting, you’ve ever done anything right.

While we can’t change the growing pains that accompany the teenage years, we have compiled some helpful suggestions to maximizing communication between you and your teen. Read more »

child-beach

ADHD: The Pros and Cons of a “Medication Holiday”

child-beachWritten by Dr. Glen Elliott, CHC Chief Psychiatrist and Medical Director

Summer checklist: Sunblock…check. Beach towels…check. Medication…uncheck?

During the school year, many children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) use medications—especially stimulants such as methylphenidate (e.g., Ritalin, Concerta, Focalin) or amphetamine (e.g., Adderall, Vyvanse)—to increase focus and attention span and decrease restlessness and impulsivity. This is especially true for children who have both high activity levels and impulsivity found with combined-type ADHD (ADHD-C) but may also be the case for the primarily inattentive type of ADHD (ADHD-I). Because stimulants provide symptom relief soon after taking them but are out of the system by the end of the day, there is the option of taking a “medication holiday” over the summer. But what are the pros and cons? Read more »

NCSA

StaySafeOnline.org [web resource]

NCSA
StaySafeOnline.org
is a resource provided by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), whose mission is to “educate and empower our global digital society to use the Internet safely and securely.” NCSA provides a broad array of resources, which are organized by the target audience and topic. Read more »

Be Internet Awesome

Online Safety Computer Game for Kids [web resource]

Be Internet AwesomeGoogle has created Be Internet Awesome, a classroom curriculum and computer game to teach children about online safety and security.

The Be Internet Awesome program helps young people become more Internet savvy and encourages them to be good Internet citizens. A collection of educational materials appropriate for students in the third to fifth grades are also available on the Be Internet Awesome website. Read more »

teen-with-laptop

Staying Safe on the Internet [web resource]

teen with laptop photoThe Internet has opened up a whole new world for people of all ages, but it does come with some risks. How much do you know about Internet safety?

Take this quiz to assess your knowledge of safe behavior and practices. Then check out the following links for information about how to stay safe online . . . Read more »

gh-logo

Girlshealth.gov [web resource]

girlshealthGirlshealth.gov was created in 2002 by the Office on Women’s Health, a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Girlshealth.gov is committed to empowering girls to create strong, positive relationships and happy, healthy futures by providing girls reliable, useful information on health and well-being. This website covers hundreds of topics, including . . . Read more »

dyslexia

Unidentified Dyslexia Takes Heavy Toll

student photoThe National Institutes of Health estimates that between 6 percent and 17 percent of school-age children have some form of dyslexia, although not all of those students may have been identified by their schools.

Anyone who has taught a dyslexic student has observed that dyslexia, typically considered a reading disability, affects other areas of learning. It makes spelling difficult. It makes writing difficult. It can even make memorizing math facts difficult. It simply makes school difficult—every day and in every way. Read more »

wscc-model-lg

Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) [downloadable]

wscc-model-lgEstablishing healthy behaviors during childhood is easier and more effective than trying to change unhealthy behaviors during adulthood. Schools play a critical role in promoting the health and safety of young people and helping them establish lifelong healthy behavior patterns. Research shows a link between the health outcomes of young people and their academic success. To have the most positive impact on the health outcomes of young people, government agencies, community organizations, schools, and other community members must work together through a collaborative and comprehensive approach. Read more »

female_teen

Positive Parenting Practices [downloadable]

teen photoParenting a teen is not easy. Many outside influences distract our youth and add challenges to parenting efforts. Youth need adults who are there for them—people who connect with them, communicate with them, spend time with them, and show a genuine interest in them. A key parental role is helping teens understand that their health and well-being—now and in the future—are not simply a matter of chance, but a matter of choice.

By engaging in positive parenting, parents can help their adolescent make healthy choices. Read more »

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