Learning & School

child-beach

ADHD: The Pros and Cons of a “Medication Holiday”

child-beachSummer checklist: Sunblock…check. Beach towels…check. Medication…uncheck?

During the school year, many children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) use medications—especially stimulants such as methylphenidate (e.g., Ritalin, Concerta, Focalin) or amphetamine (e.g., Adderall, Vyvanse)—to increase focus and attention span and decrease restlessness and impulsivity. This is especially true for children who have both high activity levels and impulsivity found with combined-type ADHD (ADHD-C) but may also be the case for the primarily inattentive type of ADHD (ADHD-I). Because stimulants provide symptom relief soon after taking them but are out of the system by the end of the day, there is the option of taking a “medication holiday” over the summer. But what are the pros and cons? Read more ›

NCSA

StaySafeOnline.org [web resource]

NCSA
StaySafeOnline.org
is a resource provided by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), whose mission is to “educate and empower our global digital society to use the Internet safely and securely.” NCSA provides a broad array of resources, which are organized by the target audience and topic. Read more ›

Be Internet Awesome

Online Safety Computer Game for Kids [web resource]

Be Internet AwesomeGoogle has created Be Internet Awesome, a classroom curriculum and computer game to teach children about online safety and security.

The Be Internet Awesome program helps young people become more Internet savvy and encourages them to be good Internet citizens. A collection of educational materials appropriate for students in the third to fifth grades are also available on the Be Internet Awesome website. Read more ›

dyslexia

Unidentified Dyslexia Takes Heavy Toll

student photoThe National Institutes of Health estimates that between 6 percent and 17 percent of school-age children have some form of dyslexia, although not all of those students may have been identified by their schools.

Anyone who has taught a dyslexic student has observed that dyslexia, typically considered a reading disability, affects other areas of learning. It makes spelling difficult. It makes writing difficult. It can even make memorizing math facts difficult. It simply makes school difficult—every day and in every way. Read more ›

wscc-model-lg

Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) [downloadable]

wscc-model-lgEstablishing healthy behaviors during childhood is easier and more effective than trying to change unhealthy behaviors during adulthood. Schools play a critical role in promoting the health and safety of young people and helping them establish lifelong healthy behavior patterns. Research shows a link between the health outcomes of young people and their academic success. To have the most positive impact on the health outcomes of young people, government agencies, community organizations, schools, and other community members must work together through a collaborative and comprehensive approach. Read more ›

Mother And Daughter Meeting With Male Teacher

Ways to Engage in Your Child’s School to Support Student Health and Learning [downloadable]

Mother And Daughter Meeting With Male TeacherAs a parent, you want your child to do well in school. You also want your child to be healthy and avoid behaviors that are risky or harmful. Through your guidance and support, you can have great influence on your child’s health and learning. One way you can show your support is by being involved in your child’s school. When parents are engaged in their children’s school activities, their children get better grades, choose healthier behaviors, and have better social skills.

Read more ›

genderexpressreport

Health Risk Behaviors among Gender Expansive Students (downloadable)

genderexpressreport

Young people whose gender expression does not fit traditional roles based on their sex assigned at birth—often referred to as gender nonconforming, gender expansive, or nonbinary youth—are at increased risk for a variety of health risk behaviors. Research on gender nonconformity among sexual minority youth has shown that such youth face an increased risk of victimization (bullying, abuse, sexual harassment) and worse behavioral health outcomes (depression, suicide, drug use) compared to their peers. Read more ›

healthykids_org

American Academy of Pediatrics HealthyChildren.org [web resource]

healthykids_orgThe American Academy of Pediatrics is an organization of  66​,000 pediatricians committed to the optimal physical, mental, and social health and well-being for all infants, children, adolescents, and young adults.​ In 2009, the AAP launched HealthyChildren.org to provide parents with health information from a trustworthy source.
Read more ›

AEV_Headshot

How I Learned Not to Be “That Mom” — a Mother’s Experience Advocating for Her Child With a Learning Disability

AEV_HeadshotAmy Valentine is the director of the Foundation for Blended and Online Learning, and she previously served as executive director of three virtual schools in Colorado. In early 2016, Valentine’s son was diagnosed with dysgraphia, a learning disability similar to dyslexia.

This is a difficult situation for a school, especially pre-diagnosis. As Valentine explains, “Post-diagnosis, though, there is support available for students who struggle to overcome a learning disability, from individual education plans to resource teachers and and technology assists. For my son, however, these tools did not materialize.” Read more ›

Community Education

ADHD: Signs and Classroom Strategies [presentation]

ADHD appears in different ways and can definitely result in struggles at school for affected kids. If you have kids in your classroom who are easily distracted, have a hard time paying attention, trouble controlling behavior or are nonstop talkers, CHC’s Marcela Molina, LMFT and Danna Torres, MTF-I offer suggestions and practical classroom strategies. Read more ›

1 2 3 7