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Learning & School

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Study: Kind Communities – A Bridge to Youth Mental Wellness

friendship-2156174_640The Born This Way Foundation commissioned a study through Benenson Strategy Group, who surveyed over 3,000 young people between the ages 15-24 and over 1,000 parents, asking questions about mental health and wellness.

The results of the study, “Kind Communities – A Bridge to Youth Mental Wellness”, will be used to raise awareness about mental health and well being and to provide people with helpful information that’s relevant to their own lives.  Read more ›

edutopia

Edutopia: Evidence-Based Practices and Strategies for K-12 Educators [web resource]

edutopiaFunded by the George Lucas Educational FoundationEd utopia is dedicated to transforming kindergarten through 12th-grade (K-12) education so all students can thrive in their studies, careers, and adult lives. Their focus is on the practices and programs that help students acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes, skills and beliefs to achieve their full potential.

Edutopia offers a range of resources to help educators implement the core strategies aimed at “empowering students to think critically, access and analyze information, creatively problem solve, work collaboratively, and communicate with clarity and impact.” Read more ›

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Helping Students With Autism Transition Into a New School Year

close up boyStudents on the autism spectrum often find transitioning to new situations challenging. Parents and teachers can minimize the stress with some joint prep before school starts.

Elizabeth W. Barnes, an author, blogger (see Autism Mom), and a parent of a child on the autism spectrum, shares tips on coordinating with her son’s school and his teacher before the start of each school year to achieve a smoother transition. Read more ›

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Five Myths About Transgender Students Educators Need to Unlearn

colorful-brainDr. Laura Erickson-Schroth, a psychiatrist working with LGBT people in New York City, is the co-author, with Laura A. Jacobs, of the recently published ‘You’re in the Wrong Bathroom!’ and 20 Other Myths and Misconceptions About Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming People.

In an article published in Education Week, she writes, “…Most schools have no formal rules around gender inclusion and do not address gender identity in curricula. Because of this, many K-12 educators have difficulty knowing how to begin talking with students about gender identity.” Read more ›

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Signs of Common Learning Disabilities

child with book photoMany children have difficulty with reading, writing, or other learning-related tasks at some point, but this does not mean they have learning disabilities. A child with a learning disability often has several related signs, and these persist over time.

Each learning disability has its own signs. Also, not every person with a particular disability will have all of the signs of that disability. Children being taught in a second language that they are learning sometimes act in ways that are similar to the behaviors of someone with a learning disability. For this reason, learning disability assessment must take into account whether a student is bilingual or a second language learner. Read more ›

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Just the Facts about Sexual Orientation and Youth: A Primer for Principals, Educators and School Personnel [downloadble]

justthefactsreportcoverThe American Psychological Association and the other 12 organizations that comprise the Just the Facts Coalition have just published a new edition of “Just the Facts about Sexual Orientation and Youth: A Primer for Principals, Educators, and School Personnel“.

This booklet is intended to provide principals, educators, and school personnel with accurate information that will help them respond to a recent upsurge in promotion of efforts to change sexual orientation through therapy and religious ministries. This upsurge has been coupled with a demand that these perspectives on homosexuality be given equal time in schools. Read more ›

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ADHD: The Pros and Cons of a “Medication Holiday”

child-beachWritten by Dr. Glen Elliott, CHC Chief Psychiatrist and Medical Director

Summer checklist: Sunblock…check. Beach towels…check. Medication…uncheck?

During the school year, many children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) use medications—especially stimulants such as methylphenidate (e.g., Ritalin, Concerta, Focalin) or amphetamine (e.g., Adderall, Vyvanse)—to increase focus and attention span and decrease restlessness and impulsivity. This is especially true for children who have both high activity levels and impulsivity found with combined-type ADHD (ADHD-C) but may also be the case for the primarily inattentive type of ADHD (ADHD-I). Because stimulants provide symptom relief soon after taking them but are out of the system by the end of the day, there is the option of taking a “medication holiday” over the summer. But what are the pros and cons? Read more ›

NCSA

StaySafeOnline.org [web resource]

NCSA
StaySafeOnline.org
is a resource provided by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), whose mission is to “educate and empower our global digital society to use the Internet safely and securely.” NCSA provides a broad array of resources, which are organized by the target audience and topic. Read more ›

Be Internet Awesome

Online Safety Computer Game for Kids [web resource]

Be Internet AwesomeGoogle has created Be Internet Awesome, a classroom curriculum and computer game to teach children about online safety and security.

The Be Internet Awesome program helps young people become more Internet savvy and encourages them to be good Internet citizens. A collection of educational materials appropriate for students in the third to fifth grades are also available on the Be Internet Awesome website. Read more ›

dyslexia

Unidentified Dyslexia Takes Heavy Toll

student photoThe National Institutes of Health estimates that between 6 percent and 17 percent of school-age children have some form of dyslexia, although not all of those students may have been identified by their schools.

Anyone who has taught a dyslexic student has observed that dyslexia, typically considered a reading disability, affects other areas of learning. It makes spelling difficult. It makes writing difficult. It can even make memorizing math facts difficult. It simply makes school difficult—every day and in every way. Read more ›

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