Emergency Phone Numbers24-hr Crisis Lines: 855.278.4204 (Santa Clara) | 650.579.0350 (San Mateo) | 415.781.0500 (San Francisco) | 800.273.8255 or Text BAY to 741-741 (National)

In the wake of all the upsetting daily news,
please remember CHC is here for you and your family.

help@chconline.org or 650.688.3625

Learning & School

Community Education

Executive Function Strategies for Middle and High School [presentation]

Why is middle school and high school challenging for so many students? There is so much to manage–from keeping track of assignments across multiple classes and teachers to time management to organizing materials. In this session, CHC Executive Functioning expert Vanessa Fasoli, ACC, discusses strategies and tools you can use with your child to promote effective organization and planning skills. Read more ›

brain-puzzle2750453_640

Empowering Kids Who Learn Differently

In Thinking Differently, David Flink, the founder and CEO of Eye to Eye—a national mentoring program for students with learning and attention issues—enlarges our understanding of the learning process and offers powerful, innovative strategies for parenting, teaching, and supporting the 20 percent of students with learning disabilities. Flink understands the needs and experiences of these children first hand because he also has dyslexia and ADHD. Read more ›

partially compensated

Partially Compensated [video]

Krista Weltner has turned her experiences with dyslexia into a compelling stop-motion film, Partially Compensated. The film tells the story of a young girl’s struggle with dyslexia and offers insight into how others, especially educators, can learn to accept learning differences as well. Read more ›

straightAs 2017-12-01_1452

Perfect Grades Don’t Always Matter [video]

Most American students strive for a 4.0 GPA and the highest test scores, but research shows that this quest for perfection actually discourages creativity and reduces academic risk-taking. In this episode of “School Myths” author Alice Roth of The Atlantic investigates why grades aren’t everything when it comes to education. Read more ›

child-tablet 1183465_640

Three Ways Parents Can Make Digital Media a Positive for Young Kids

child-tablet 1183465_640Digital technologies have added a new element of anxiety to family life for many parents. A lot of kids now have access to mobile devices, which brings up parent concerns that kids aren’t learning to interact with people, spend too much time on devices and no longer play outside.

Sara DeWitt of PBS Kids Digital says some of parents’ deepest fears could be holding them back from seeing the potential of digital technology. Read more ›

SEL brief elementary school

Social Emotional Learning in Elementary School [downloadable]

SEL brief elementary schoolSocial and Emotional Learning in Elementary School, produced by Pennsylvania State University with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, examines the evidence of successful, universal SEL programs and practices used to support social and emotional development in students during the elementary years (K-5). Read more ›

SEL brief middle and HS

Promoting Social and Emotional Learning in the Middle and High School Years [downloadable]

SEL brief middle and HSPromoting Social and Emotional Learning in the Middle and High School Years, produced by Pennsylvania State University with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, provides an overview of frameworks that define social emotional competence, and reviews the current landscape of universal school-based programs designed to promote its growth in middle and high school students. Read more ›

apple-books 256261_640

Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia

apple-books 256261_640While scientists estimate that between 5 and 12 percent of children in the United States have dyslexia, just 4.5 percent of students in public schools are diagnosed with a “specific learning disability,” a category that includes dyslexia and other learning disabilities, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In addition, while schools routinely screen children for hearing impairment, a problem that occurs much less frequently than dyslexia, screening for dyslexia is rare. Read more ›

thought-creative 2123970_640

Dyslexia and the Wider World of Creativity and Talent

thought-creative 2123970_640Reading well can be a sign of intelligence, except when it isn’t, which is often the case for the 5-20 percent of students who have by far the most common form of learning disability, dyslexia.

And yet often, special gifts and talents emerge from dyslexic brains. Whether this happens because of the setup of the dyslexic brain or in spite of it is still an ongoing subject of research. Read more ›

Special Education & USED’s Regulatory Review: What You Need to Know

The U.S. Department of Education (USED) and all other government agencies are in the process of reviewing every regulation and policy document they’ve issued over the years. Their goal is to identify any that “eliminate jobs, or inhibit job creation;” are “outdated, unnecessary, or ineffective;” “impose costs that exceed benefits;” or interfere with regulatory reform. Read more ›

1 2 3 10