Emergency Phone Numbers24-hr Crisis Lines: 855.278.4204 (Santa Clara) | 650.579.0350 (San Mateo) | 415.781.0500 (San Francisco) | 800.273.8255 or Text BAY to 741-741 (National)

In the wake of all the upsetting daily news,
please remember CHC is here for you and your family.

help@chconline.org or 650.688.3625

Preventing Bullying Through…Fiction?

child reading photoThere have been numerous studies showing that people who read fiction have increased empathy. This is why fiction is one of the most powerful tools we have to combat bullying and intolerance.

When you see the world through another person’s eyes, you realize how similar you are to them, even if that person might seem very different from you.

If the hero of a story is poor, or bullied, or nerdy, or a refugee, you imagine what it’s like to be that kind of person, and you remember that next time you meet a person like that in real life. If there’s a kid in your class who wears shabby clothes, you may remember how Harry Potter had to sleep underneath the stairs, so maybe this kid is like that too. And just like Harry, there’s probably more to him than his outward appearance.

A lot of bullying comes from fear, and much of that fear comes from ignorance. This is why it’s so important that the fiction we give kids reflects the kind of diversity they will encounter in real life. We can even do this for early readers by giving them picture books that are inclusive of characters of varying races, backgrounds, and abilities.

In a way, reading is practice for real life. If you encounter people who are different from you in books, you’ll be less surprised when you encounter them in real life. There’s safety in reading. Kids self-censor when reading a scary book: They know they can close it at any time. Through reading, they can control their exposure to things (or people) that make them uncomfortable, while still being exposed to them. If a child is afraid of going to the doctor or standing up to a bully, they can see how people in books have dealt with those situations. The ability to explore and rehearse in fiction gives kids the courage to explore in real life.

Read the full article by Michael Dahl, author of more than 100 books for children and young adult, in eSchoolNews online.


To schedule an evaluation or to get advice about your child’s challenges, call or email a CHC Care Manager at 650.688.3625 or caremanager@chconline.org

Photo by Enokson

Tags: , , , ,