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Resources Tagged With: adolescence

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Social Media Apps Causing Trouble in Schools

socialmedia-998990_640It’s tough to keep up with all the latest apps kids get into. And the truth is, you don’t have to know every single detail of how each one works. The most important thing is to keep the lines of communication open with your kid. Talk about their social media, ask questions — and listen. Pay attention to anything that sounds like a red flag and dig deeper. Helping your kid learn to use social media responsibly is the most effective way to help them stay safe online. Read more ›

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The Family Acceptance Project [downloadable]

The Family Acceptance Project® (FAP) is a research, intervention, education and policy initiative that works to prevent health and mental health risks for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) children and youth, including suicide, homelessness and HIV – in the context of their families, cultures and faith communities. FAP uses a research-based, culturally grounded approach to help ethnically, socially and religiously diverse families to support their LGBT children. Read more ›

CSM Gender Report

How Stereotypes in Movies and on TV Impact Kids’ Development [downloadable]

CSM Gender ReportA new Common Sense Media study shows that learning gender roles from movies and TV shows has real consequences on kids’ self-esteem, relationships, and even their future careers.

The Common Sense Media report, Watching Gender: How Stereotypes in Movies and on TV Impact Kids’ Development analyzes more than 150 articles, interviews, books, and other social-scientific research and finds that gender stereotypes in movies and on TV shows are widespread and very influential — teaching children what the culture expects of boys and girls. According to the report, a lifetime of viewing stereotypical media becomes so ingrained it can ultimately affect kids’ career choices, self-worth, relationships, and ability to achieve their full potential. Read more ›

moody teen

Top 10 Tips for Talking to Your Teen

moody teenTeenagers are known for being moody, irritable and stressed out. Just watch any old episode of Gossip Girl, Gilmore Girls or Glee. Trying to get through to your teen can feel about as productive as trying to get your houseplant to empty the dishwasher. The teen-parent relationship is often a power struggle: a seemingly perpetual game of tug-o-war. You want to be supportive, loving and open while simultaneously trying to enforce cell phone limitations and curfews. Meanwhile, your once kind and courteous child is asserting himself in a way that makes you wonder whether, in your years of parenting, you’ve ever done anything right.

While we can’t change the growing pains that accompany the teenage years, we have compiled some helpful suggestions to maximizing communication between you and your teen. Read more ›

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Girlshealth.gov [web resource]

girlshealthGirlshealth.gov was created in 2002 by the Office on Women’s Health, a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Girlshealth.gov is committed to empowering girls to create strong, positive relationships and happy, healthy futures by providing girls reliable, useful information on health and well-being. This website covers hundreds of topics, including . . . Read more ›

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Health Risk Behaviors among Gender Expansive Students (downloadable)

genderexpressreport

Young people whose gender expression does not fit traditional roles based on their sex assigned at birth—often referred to as gender nonconforming, gender expansive, or nonbinary youth—are at increased risk for a variety of health risk behaviors. Research on gender nonconformity among sexual minority youth has shown that such youth face an increased risk of victimization (bullying, abuse, sexual harassment) and worse behavioral health outcomes (depression, suicide, drug use) compared to their peers. Read more ›

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13 Reasons Why: Talking Points for Viewing and Discussing the Netflix Series [downloadable]

13 reasons talking pointsNetflix’s 13 Reasons Why (13RY), a TV series based on a popular novel of the same name, is a  fictional story and cautionary tale of a young girl’s suicide, and it covers other sensitive subject matter as the series progresses.

In response to the series, the JED Foundation and Suicide Awareness Voices of Education (SAVE) developed talking points to assist parents, teachers, and other gatekeepers in talking to youth about suicide as it relates to the situational drama that unfolds in 13RY.  Read more ›

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Netflix 13 Reasons Why: What Viewers Should Consider

thirteen reasonsIn March 2017, Netflix released Thirteen Reasons Why (13RY), a 13-part series based on the young-adult fiction novel written by Jay Asher and published in 2007.

Thirteen Reasons Why tells the story of a high school student who experiences a series of terrible events—many of which are perpetrated by her classmates and friends. The protagonist, Hannah, has died by suicide. Before she died, she made a series of tapes explaining what each person in her circle has done to hurt her. Each episode tells one part of the story focused on a painful event and interaction. Read more ›

Community Education

How Are Teens Experiencing Gender? [presentation]

In this session, Anthony Ross, MS, Director of Outlet at Adolescent Counseling Services in Redwood City, provides parents with an introduction to gender diversity in youth. Among the topics covered are the spectrum of gender and sexuality,  LGBTQIA+ terminology, and why it is important to create safer spaces for LGBTQ+ youth. Read more ›

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Recognizing Adolescent Depression

sad teenIt’s not unusual for young people to experience “the blues” or feel “down in the dumps” occasionally. Adolescence is always an unsettling time, with the many physical, emotional, psychological and social changes that accompany this stage of life.

Unrealistic academic, social, or family expectations can create a strong sense of rejection and can lead to deep disappointment. When things go wrong at school or at home, teens often overreact. Many young people feel that life is not fair or that things “never go their way.” They feel “stressed out” and confused. To make matters worse, teens are bombarded by conflicting messages from parents, friends and society. Read more ›

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