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Resources Tagged With: article

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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

anxiety photoObsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common, chronic and long-lasting disorder in which a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions) that he or she feels the urge to repeat over and over.

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Tips for Traveling with a Child with Autism

child-carOne big concern with many children with autism is safety. Not just for themselves but for others around them as well. As a parent of a child with autism, your home more often becomes your fortress. And carefree trips to the zoo or the park? They’re not going to happen — not without major planning and precautions, anyhow. But the biggest issue is getting from Point A to Point B.

So how do you keep you keep yourself and yours child safe in the car? There are a few basic steps that can done to ensure the driver is not distracted or the child tries to escape while the car is in motion. Read more ›

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Helping Students With Autism Transition Into a New School Year

close up boyStudents on the autism spectrum often find transitioning to new situations challenging. Parents and teachers can minimize the stress with some joint prep before school starts.

Elizabeth W. Barnes, an author, blogger (see Autism Mom), and a parent of a child on the autism spectrum, shares tips on coordinating with her son’s school and his teacher before the start of each school year to achieve a smoother transition. Read more ›

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Five Myths About Transgender Students Educators Need to Unlearn

colorful-brainDr. Laura Erickson-Schroth, a psychiatrist working with LGBT people in New York City, is the co-author, with Laura A. Jacobs, of the recently published ‘You’re in the Wrong Bathroom!’ and 20 Other Myths and Misconceptions About Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming People.

In an article published in Education Week, she writes, “…Most schools have no formal rules around gender inclusion and do not address gender identity in curricula. Because of this, many K-12 educators have difficulty knowing how to begin talking with students about gender identity.” Read more ›

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Mental Health Resources for Teens

depress photoTaking the first step in seeking support for any issues you’re dealing with deserves major props: It’s brave, it’s smart, and it’s an act of self-love. For adults, it can be tricky to navigate what those next steps are, and it can be even tougher for teens.

Teen Vogue spoke to experts from across the country and researched options for teens who need help—anywhere, anytime, and on any budget, whether you are in a crisis or looking for ongoing support or medical treatment for a number of conditions. Read more ›

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Signs of Common Learning Disabilities

child with book photoMany children have difficulty with reading, writing, or other learning-related tasks at some point, but this does not mean they have learning disabilities. A child with a learning disability often has several related signs, and these persist over time.

Each learning disability has its own signs. Also, not every person with a particular disability will have all of the signs of that disability. Children being taught in a second language that they are learning sometimes act in ways that are similar to the behaviors of someone with a learning disability. For this reason, learning disability assessment must take into account whether a student is bilingual or a second language learner. Read more ›

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Top 10 Tips for Talking to Your Teen

moody teenTeenagers are known for being moody, irritable and stressed out. Just watch any old episode of Gossip Girl, Gilmore Girls or Glee. Trying to get through to your teen can feel about as productive as trying to get your houseplant to empty the dishwasher. The teen-parent relationship is often a power struggle: a seemingly perpetual game of tug-o-war. You want to be supportive, loving and open while simultaneously trying to enforce cell phone limitations and curfews. Meanwhile, your once kind and courteous child is asserting himself in a way that makes you wonder whether, in your years of parenting, you’ve ever done anything right.

While we can’t change the growing pains that accompany the teenage years, we have compiled some helpful suggestions to maximizing communication between you and your teen. Read more ›

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ADHD: The Pros and Cons of a “Medication Holiday”

child-beachWritten by Dr. Glen Elliott, CHC Chief Psychiatrist and Medical Director

Summer checklist: Sunblock…check. Beach towels…check. Medication…uncheck?

During the school year, many children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) use medications—especially stimulants such as methylphenidate (e.g., Ritalin, Concerta, Focalin) or amphetamine (e.g., Adderall, Vyvanse)—to increase focus and attention span and decrease restlessness and impulsivity. This is especially true for children who have both high activity levels and impulsivity found with combined-type ADHD (ADHD-C) but may also be the case for the primarily inattentive type of ADHD (ADHD-I). Because stimulants provide symptom relief soon after taking them but are out of the system by the end of the day, there is the option of taking a “medication holiday” over the summer. But what are the pros and cons? Read more ›

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Unidentified Dyslexia Takes Heavy Toll

student photoThe National Institutes of Health estimates that between 6 percent and 17 percent of school-age children have some form of dyslexia, although not all of those students may have been identified by their schools.

Anyone who has taught a dyslexic student has observed that dyslexia, typically considered a reading disability, affects other areas of learning. It makes spelling difficult. It makes writing difficult. It can even make memorizing math facts difficult. It simply makes school difficult—every day and in every way. Read more ›

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Parenting: 6 Reasons Your Teen’s Life is More Stressful Than Your Own

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John Nicholls, is the Assistant Director of Leadership Development at Nord Anglia International School Hong Kong, and he is the father of four teenagers.  In this article about teen stress, Nicholls shares what he has learned from his teens about the sometimes subtle pressures — biological, social and psychological — that make being a 21st-century teenager so complicated. Read more ›

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