Emergency Phone Numbers24-hr Crisis Lines: 855.278.4204 (Santa Clara) | 650.579.0350 (San Mateo) | 415.781.0500 (San Francisco) | 800.273.8255 or Text BAY to 741-741 (National)

In the wake of all the upsetting daily news,
please remember CHC is here for you and your family.

help@chconline.org or 650.688.3625

Resources Tagged With: depression

SAD seasonal affective disorder-1861157_640

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

SAD seasonal affective disorder-1861157_640Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that comes and goes with the seasons, typically starting in the late fall and early winter and going away during the spring and summer. It can affect adults, teens, and children. Read more ›

smartphone-2212963_640

A Crisis Line That Calms With Texting and Data

smartphone-2212963_640Can algorithms be used to address more urgent social and individual problems, like how to build trust or provide effective care? Can algorithms be used to increase the love and kindness in the world?

These are the sort of questions that the people at the Crisis Text Line — a nonprofit organization that provides crisis intervention 24 hours a day via text messaging to the number 741741 — have been focusing on for four years. Read more ›

sad boy12

The Most Wonderful Time of the Year?

hands holding coffee-247835It’s hard to escape it: Christmas tunes on every radio station, snowflake cups at Starbucks, pine trees atop every other SUV. “It’s the hap-happiest season of all,” right?

Not necessarily. For many, the holidays amplify insecurities, social anxiety, financial stress, loved ones lost, or the fact that they can’t just “snap out” of their angst with a grande peppermint latte. Read more ›

Community Education

How to Help Your Anxious Young Child [presentation] [video]

How do you know what is typical and what is not?  In this class led by David Arbulú, MA, Marriage & Family Therapist at CHC, learn the signs of anxiety in young children and some strategies to help your young child manage anxiety.
Read more ›

To Write Love on Her Arms [web resource]

To Write Love on Her Arms is a non-profit movement dedicated to presenting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury, and suicide.

TWLOHA exists to encourage, inform, inspire, and invest directly into treatment and recovery. Read more ›

Community Education

Helping Teens Cope with Anxiety — Archbishop Mitty High School Session [presentation]

In this session at Archbishop Mitty High School, Annaleah Logan, PsyD. discusses the different forms of anxiety and their respective symptoms, the stressors that teens experience, causes of teen anxiety and depression, and coping strategies. Read more ›

Community Education

Anxiety and Depression in Teens [presentation]

In this parent education session held at the German International School of Silicon Valley, CHC’s Tonia Chen, MA, LMFT and Christine Wang, EdM invite parents to step into the shoes of their teens to better understand the complexities of a teen’s mood as well as their unique job. The discussion includes parents’ role in modeling and teaching stress management to their teens.

Read more ›

little-boy-hiding1635065_640

Educators Employ Strategies To Help Kids With Anxiety Return To School

little-boy-hiding1635065_640The Anxiety and Depression Association of America estimates anxiety-based school refusal affects 2 to 5 percent of school-age children. It is often triggered when students are transitioning into middle or high school. Doctors say it should be treated with flexibility and therapy – not punishment. Read more ›

boy crisis

How to Help Children Cope with a Crisis

boy crisisHere are ten tips Save the Children recommends for parents, teachers, grandparents and caregivers to provide comfort and understanding to children: Read more ›

social-media-1430512_1280

Social Media Can Boost Teens’ Self-Esteem — or Foster Depression

social-media-1430512_1280Using social media to connect with others is kind of like having a private conversation in a public place. But there’s a difference. Even when you’re chatting with a friend in the middle of a physical crowd, most other people can’t hear what you say. On social media, your conversations can be read by anyone with access.

Depending on whether people notice your posts — and how positively they respond — your online interactions may be quite positive. Or not. Social media can make some teens feel depressed and isolated. Read more ›

1 2 3 13