Resources Tagged With: downloadable

NCSA

StaySafeOnline.org [web resource]

NCSA
StaySafeOnline.org
is a resource provided by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), whose mission is to “educate and empower our global digital society to use the Internet safely and securely.” NCSA provides a broad array of resources, which are organized by the target audience and topic. Read more ›

Be Internet Awesome

Online Safety Computer Game for Kids [web resource]

Be Internet AwesomeGoogle has created Be Internet Awesome, a classroom curriculum and computer game to teach children about online safety and security.

The Be Internet Awesome program helps young people become more Internet savvy and encourages them to be good Internet citizens. A collection of educational materials appropriate for students in the third to fifth grades are also available on the Be Internet Awesome website. Read more ›

wscc-model-lg

Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) [downloadable]

wscc-model-lgEstablishing healthy behaviors during childhood is easier and more effective than trying to change unhealthy behaviors during adulthood. Schools play a critical role in promoting the health and safety of young people and helping them establish lifelong healthy behavior patterns. Research shows a link between the health outcomes of young people and their academic success. To have the most positive impact on the health outcomes of young people, government agencies, community organizations, schools, and other community members must work together through a collaborative and comprehensive approach. Read more ›

female_teen

Positive Parenting Practices [downloadable]

teen photoParenting a teen is not easy. Many outside influences distract our youth and add challenges to parenting efforts. Youth need adults who are there for them—people who connect with them, communicate with them, spend time with them, and show a genuine interest in them. A key parental role is helping teens understand that their health and well-being—now and in the future—are not simply a matter of chance, but a matter of choice.

By engaging in positive parenting, parents can help their adolescent make healthy choices. Read more ›

Mother And Daughter Meeting With Male Teacher

Ways to Engage in Your Child’s School to Support Student Health and Learning [downloadable]

Mother And Daughter Meeting With Male TeacherAs a parent, you want your child to do well in school. You also want your child to be healthy and avoid behaviors that are risky or harmful. Through your guidance and support, you can have great influence on your child’s health and learning. One way you can show your support is by being involved in your child’s school. When parents are engaged in their children’s school activities, their children get better grades, choose healthier behaviors, and have better social skills.

Read more ›

genderexpressreport

Health Risk Behaviors among Gender Expansive Students (downloadable)

genderexpressreport

Young people whose gender expression does not fit traditional roles based on their sex assigned at birth—often referred to as gender nonconforming, gender expansive, or nonbinary youth—are at increased risk for a variety of health risk behaviors. Research on gender nonconformity among sexual minority youth has shown that such youth face an increased risk of victimization (bullying, abuse, sexual harassment) and worse behavioral health outcomes (depression, suicide, drug use) compared to their peers. Read more ›

worried child-2122019_640

10 Things Your Anxious Child Wants You to Know [downloadable]

worried child-2122019_640“It’s really hard to stop worrying.”
“My worries are real to me.”
“I really can’t fall asleep alone.”

In her work with children, Katie Hurley, LCSW, asks, “What is the one thing you wish your parents understood about your anxiety?”
The children’s answers vary, but there are some common themes… Read more ›

Community Education

Cognitive and Social Emotional Resilience in Children with Dyslexia [presentation]

In this Community Educations session for educators, UCSF School of Medicine’s Dr. Fumiko Hoeft discusses:

– The resilience framework of dyslexia
– Cognitive resilience
– Socio-Emotional resilience
Read more ›

standford medicine

South Bay and Peninsula Resources for Mental Health and Resilience [downloadable]

standford medicineThe following list of local mental health resources is provided courtesy of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing:

Helpful Numbers

24-hour Suicide and Crisis Line (Santa Clara County) 650-494-8420 or 408-279-3312
Uplift (EMQ) Crisis Team (Santa Clara County) 408-379-9085 or 877-412-7474
Star Vista Crisis Line (San Mateo County): 650-579-0350
NAMI Santa Clara Warm line: 408-435-0400, option 1
NAMI San Mateo Warm line: 650-638-0800
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) Suicide prevention telephone hotline funded by the U.S. government. Provides free, 24-hour assistance.
Rape Crisis Hot Line (24 hour): 650.493.7273

Read more ›

13 reasons talking points

13 Reasons Why: Talking Points for Viewing and Discussing the Netflix Series [downloadable]

13 reasons talking pointsNetflix’s 13 Reasons Why (13RY), a TV series based on a popular novel of the same name, is a  fictional story and cautionary tale of a young girl’s suicide, and it covers other sensitive subject matter as the series progresses.

In response to the series, the JED Foundation and Suicide Awareness Voices of Education (SAVE) developed talking points to assist parents, teachers, and other gatekeepers in talking to youth about suicide as it relates to the situational drama that unfolds in 13RY.  Read more ›

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