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Resources Tagged With: dyslexia

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Empowering Kids Who Learn Differently

In Thinking Differently, David Flink, the founder and CEO of Eye to Eye—a national mentoring program for students with learning and attention issues—enlarges our understanding of the learning process and offers powerful, innovative strategies for parenting, teaching, and supporting the 20 percent of students with learning disabilities. Flink understands the needs and experiences of these children first hand because he also has dyslexia and ADHD. Read more ›

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Partially Compensated [video]

Krista Weltner has turned her experiences with dyslexia into a compelling stop-motion film, Partially Compensated. The film tells the story of a young girl’s struggle with dyslexia and offers insight into how others, especially educators, can learn to accept learning differences as well. Read more ›

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Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia

apple-books 256261_640While scientists estimate that between 5 and 12 percent of children in the United States have dyslexia, just 4.5 percent of students in public schools are diagnosed with a “specific learning disability,” a category that includes dyslexia and other learning disabilities, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In addition, while schools routinely screen children for hearing impairment, a problem that occurs much less frequently than dyslexia, screening for dyslexia is rare. Read more ›

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Dyslexia and the Wider World of Creativity and Talent

thought-creative 2123970_640Reading well can be a sign of intelligence, except when it isn’t, which is often the case for the 5-20 percent of students who have by far the most common form of learning disability, dyslexia.

And yet often, special gifts and talents emerge from dyslexic brains. Whether this happens because of the setup of the dyslexic brain or in spite of it is still an ongoing subject of research. Read more ›

Community Education

Does My Child Have a Reading Problem? [presentation]

Are you concerned that your child may have a reading problem?
Literacy Program Director at Sand Hill School Lisa Parnello MEd takes a closer look at reading difficulties. Read more ›

Community Education

Social Emotional Resilience in Children with Dyslexia [presentation]

In this Community Educations session for educators, UCSF School of Medicine’s Dr. Fumiko Hoeft discusses:

– The resilience framework of dyslexia
– Cognitive resilience
– Socio-emotional resilience
Read more ›

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Signs of Common Learning Disabilities

child with book photoMany children have difficulty with reading, writing, or other learning-related tasks at some point, but this does not mean they have learning disabilities. A child with a learning disability often has several related signs, and these persist over time.

Each learning disability has its own signs. Also, not every person with a particular disability will have all of the signs of that disability. Children being taught in a second language that they are learning sometimes act in ways that are similar to the behaviors of someone with a learning disability. For this reason, learning disability assessment must take into account whether a student is bilingual or a second language learner. Read more ›

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Unidentified Dyslexia Takes Heavy Toll

student photoThe National Institutes of Health estimates that between 6 percent and 17 percent of school-age children have some form of dyslexia, although not all of those students may have been identified by their schools.

Anyone who has taught a dyslexic student has observed that dyslexia, typically considered a reading disability, affects other areas of learning. It makes spelling difficult. It makes writing difficult. It can even make memorizing math facts difficult. It simply makes school difficult—every day and in every way. Read more ›

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How I Learned Not to Be “That Mom” — a Mother’s Experience Advocating for Her Child With a Learning Disability

AEV_HeadshotAmy Valentine is the director of the Foundation for Blended and Online Learning, and she previously served as executive director of three virtual schools in Colorado. In early 2016, Valentine’s son was diagnosed with dysgraphia, a learning disability similar to dyslexia.

This is a difficult situation for a school, especially pre-diagnosis. As Valentine explains, “Post-diagnosis, though, there is support available for students who struggle to overcome a learning disability, from individual education plans to resource teachers and and technology assists. For my son, however, these tools did not materialize.” Read more ›

Community Education

Cognitive and Social Emotional Resilience in Children with Dyslexia [presentation]

In this Community Educations session for educators, UCSF School of Medicine’s Dr. Fumiko Hoeft discusses:

– The resilience framework of dyslexia
– Cognitive resilience
– Socio-Emotional resilience
Read more ›

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