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Resources Tagged With: learning challenges

Community Education

ADHD: Signs and Classroom Strategies [presentation]

ADHD appears in different ways and can definitely result in struggles at school for affected kids. If you have kids in your classroom who are easily distracted, have a hard time paying attention, trouble controlling behavior or are nonstop talkers, CHC’s Lisa Parnello MAEd offers suggestions and practical classroom strategies. Read more ›

Community Education

Social Emotional Resilience in Children with Dyslexia [presentation]

In this Community Educations session for educators, UCSF School of Medicine’s Dr. Fumiko Hoeft discusses:

– The resilience framework of dyslexia
– Cognitive resilience
– Socio-emotional resilience
Read more ›

back-to-school

Disability Terms and Definitions Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

IDEAThere are 13 categories that guide how disability is defined under the federal special education law known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).  In order to be eligible for special education and related services as a “child with a disability,” a child’s educational performance must be adversely affected due to the disability. Read more ›

sensory room video still

The Sensory Room: Helping Students With Autism Focus and Learn

Sensory rooms are specially created environments created to provide an immersive sensory experience. For children on the autism spectrum, sensory rooms are designed to have a calming effect that reduces anxiety and improves focus.

This video is part of the Schools That Work series from Edutopia featuring Meriden Public Schools in Connecticut and the ways in which the district has redesigned its special education services. Read more ›

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K-12 Sensory Rooms Offer Safe Space for Special Needs

ball-pit-1661374_640Sensory rooms not only help students with special needs feel more comfortable and empowered in the classroom, they may also keep them in their neighborhood schools, according to K-12 administrators.

The carefully designed rooms may include dim lights to help students who are sensitive to light, weighted blankets to give them comfort or a swing they can gently rock on to become calm or spin in a circle for stimulation.

The Council for Exceptional Children says sensory rooms are getting popular in districts to help calm overstimulated or anxious students. Read more ›

Overcoming

Approaching Struggles with Enthusiasm

OvercomingStudents will flourish and students will struggle. It’s the nature of the classroom beast. Some will announce their achievements proudly and others prefer to brush their uncertainty under the rug. Regardless, the purpose of the educator(s) in the room is to ensure that all students grow from their personal place of knowing, whether they are a confident bloomer or struggling little bird learning to fly. When the struggle is real, opportunities must be in place so that all learners can approach struggles with enthusiasm. Read more ›

close up boy

Helping Students With Autism Transition Into a New School Year

close up boyStudents on the autism spectrum often find transitioning to new situations challenging. Parents and teachers can minimize the stress with some joint prep before school starts.

Elizabeth W. Barnes, an author, blogger (see Autism Mom), and a parent of a child on the autism spectrum, shares tips on coordinating with her son’s school and his teacher before the start of each school year to achieve a smoother transition. Read more ›

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Signs of Common Learning Disabilities

child with book photoMany children have difficulty with reading, writing, or other learning-related tasks at some point, but this does not mean they have learning disabilities. A child with a learning disability often has several related signs, and these persist over time.

Each learning disability has its own signs. Also, not every person with a particular disability will have all of the signs of that disability. Children being taught in a second language that they are learning sometimes act in ways that are similar to the behaviors of someone with a learning disability. For this reason, learning disability assessment must take into account whether a student is bilingual or a second language learner. Read more ›

child-beach

ADHD: The Pros and Cons of a “Medication Holiday”

child-beachWritten by Dr. Glen Elliott, CHC Chief Psychiatrist and Medical Director

Summer checklist: Sunblock…check. Beach towels…check. Medication…uncheck?

During the school year, many children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) use medications—especially stimulants such as methylphenidate (e.g., Ritalin, Concerta, Focalin) or amphetamine (e.g., Adderall, Vyvanse)—to increase focus and attention span and decrease restlessness and impulsivity. This is especially true for children who have both high activity levels and impulsivity found with combined-type ADHD (ADHD-C) but may also be the case for the primarily inattentive type of ADHD (ADHD-I). Because stimulants provide symptom relief soon after taking them but are out of the system by the end of the day, there is the option of taking a “medication holiday” over the summer. But what are the pros and cons? Read more ›

dyslexia

Unidentified Dyslexia Takes Heavy Toll

student photoThe National Institutes of Health estimates that between 6 percent and 17 percent of school-age children have some form of dyslexia, although not all of those students may have been identified by their schools.

Anyone who has taught a dyslexic student has observed that dyslexia, typically considered a reading disability, affects other areas of learning. It makes spelling difficult. It makes writing difficult. It can even make memorizing math facts difficult. It simply makes school difficult—every day and in every way. Read more ›

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