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Resources Tagged With: learning differences

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Empowering Kids Who Learn Differently

In Thinking Differently, David Flink, the founder and CEO of Eye to Eye—a national mentoring program for students with learning and attention issues—enlarges our understanding of the learning process and offers powerful, innovative strategies for parenting, teaching, and supporting the 20 percent of students with learning disabilities. Flink understands the needs and experiences of these children first hand because he also has dyslexia and ADHD. Read more ›

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Partially Compensated [video]

Krista Weltner has turned her experiences with dyslexia into a compelling stop-motion film, Partially Compensated. The film tells the story of a young girl’s struggle with dyslexia and offers insight into how others, especially educators, can learn to accept learning differences as well. Read more ›

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Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia

apple-books 256261_640While scientists estimate that between 5 and 12 percent of children in the United States have dyslexia, just 4.5 percent of students in public schools are diagnosed with a “specific learning disability,” a category that includes dyslexia and other learning disabilities, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In addition, while schools routinely screen children for hearing impairment, a problem that occurs much less frequently than dyslexia, screening for dyslexia is rare. Read more ›

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Dyslexia and the Wider World of Creativity and Talent

thought-creative 2123970_640Reading well can be a sign of intelligence, except when it isn’t, which is often the case for the 5-20 percent of students who have by far the most common form of learning disability, dyslexia.

And yet often, special gifts and talents emerge from dyslexic brains. Whether this happens because of the setup of the dyslexic brain or in spite of it is still an ongoing subject of research. Read more ›

Community Education

Late & Unprepared? Executive Functioning Strategies in the Middle School Classroom [presentation]

In the educator session “Late & Unprepared? Executive Functioning Strategies in the Middle School Classroom,” Sand Hill School teacher Alixanne Agnew defines executive functioning, examines individual “functions,” and discusses strategies for building and supporting executive functioning in the classroom, including behavioral strategies and technology supports. Read more ›

Community Education

Does My Child Have a Reading Problem? [presentation]

Are you concerned that your child may have a reading problem?
Literacy Program Director at Sand Hill School Lisa Parnello MEd takes a closer look at reading difficulties. Read more ›

Community Education

ADHD: Signs and Classroom Strategies [presentation]

ADHD appears in different ways and can definitely result in struggles at school for affected kids. If you have kids in your classroom who are easily distracted, have a hard time paying attention, trouble controlling behavior or are nonstop talkers, CHC’s Lisa Parnello MAEd offers suggestions and practical classroom strategies. Read more ›

Community Education

Social Emotional Resilience in Children with Dyslexia [presentation]

In this Community Educations session for educators, UCSF School of Medicine’s Dr. Fumiko Hoeft discusses:

– The resilience framework of dyslexia
– Cognitive resilience
– Socio-emotional resilience
Read more ›

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Disability Terms and Definitions Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

IDEAThere are 13 categories that guide how disability is defined under the federal special education law known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).  In order to be eligible for special education and related services as a “child with a disability,” a child’s educational performance must be adversely affected due to the disability. Read more ›

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The Sensory Room: Helping Students With Autism Focus and Learn

Sensory rooms are specially created environments created to provide an immersive sensory experience. For children on the autism spectrum, sensory rooms are designed to have a calming effect that reduces anxiety and improves focus.

This video is part of the Schools That Work series from Edutopia featuring Meriden Public Schools in Connecticut and the ways in which the district has redesigned its special education services. Read more ›

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