Emergency Phone Numbers24-hr Crisis Lines: 855.278.4204 (Santa Clara) | 650.579.0350 (San Mateo) | 415.781.0500 (San Francisco) | 800.273.8255 or Text BAY to 741-741 (National)

In the wake of all the upsetting daily news,
please remember CHC is here for you and your family.

help@chconline.org or 650.688.3625

Resources Tagged With: LGBTQQ+

sihouetteboy62

Appearance Reported by Students as Top Reason for Bullying; Experiences Vary by Gender Identity

sihouetteboy62There are slight differences in students’ experiences with bullying across gender identities, according to a new YouthTruth survey of over 180,000 students in grades 5-12. While 1 in 4 students overall report being bullied, 44% of those who feel male or female pronouns don’t represent them say they have experienced verbal, social, physical, or online bullying. Read more ›

many hands-2724191_640

LBTQUIA+ Glossary and Other Online Resources [web resource]

many hands-2724191_640Learning about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual communities and the issues impacting these communities is a life-long process.  The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual (LGBTQIA+) Resource Center at the University of California, Davis is a dynamic, responsive and collaborative organization that serves UC Davis and the surrounding region by providing a growing spectrum of programs, resources, outreach and advocacy. Read more ›

human rights campaign

Human Rights Campaign [web resource]

human rights campaignHuman Rights Campaign (HRC) advocates for LGBTQ equality and educates the public about LGBTQ issues. Being supported at home, in school and in the community is important for all children and youth – especially lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning/queer (LGBTQ) youth. From creating an inclusive learning environment for students – whether a student is in the process of transitioning or she has two moms – to understanding the challenges and resiliency of LGBTQ youth, HRC provides a wealth of resources for supporting LGBTQ youth. Read more ›

lgbtq-2112266_640

What to Do When Your child Comes Out As LGBTQ

lgbtq-2112266_640So your child just came out as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. What do you do?

The best initial response from parents is to “give their child a hug, to say that you love them,” said Kathy Godwin, board vice president for the organization PFLAG, which supports the LGBT community and helps to educate parents, families and friends. Read more ›

fap

The Family Acceptance Project [downloadable]

The Family Acceptance Project® (FAP) is a research, intervention, education and policy initiative that works to prevent health and mental health risks for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) children and youth, including suicide, homelessness and HIV – in the context of their families, cultures and faith communities. FAP uses a research-based, culturally grounded approach to help ethnically, socially and religiously diverse families to support their LGBT children. Read more ›

charlotte patterson_0

Charlotte Patterson, at the Forefront of LGBTQ Family Studies

charlotte patterson_0Charlotte J. Patterson, Ph.D. is the world’s expert on psychological research on children and youth raised by lesbian and gay parents. A Professor of Psychology and Director of the interdisciplinary Women, Gender & Sexuality program at the University of Virginia, Patterson’s research with children and families has been published in the field’s top journals, and she has co-edited four books on the psychology of sexual orientation.

Charlotte Patterson’s landmark work, “Children of Lesbian and Gay Parents,” published as the lead article in Child Development in 1992, was among the first research that debunked then-prevalent beliefs that children with lesbian or gay parents showed compromised psychosocial development relative to children from heterosexual parents. Read more ›

loveisrespect

Loveisrespect.org [web resource]

loveisrespectA project of the National Domestic Violence Hotline, Loveisrespect is a safe, inclusive space for young people to access information and get help in an environment that is designed specifically for them, and to provide information and support to concerned friends and family members, teachers, counselors, service providers, and members of law enforcement.

The Loveisrespect website provides comprehensive education on healthy, unhealthy and abusive dating relationships and behaviors, covering topics such as… Read more ›

teen girl reclining

Resources for Families of LGBTQ Youth [web resource][downloadable]

 

teen photo

The following websites and downloadable resources were assembled by the Children’s Bureau of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help families support their lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth, understand what to expect, and learn how to talk about a number of issues that may be impacting their youth. Read more ›

justthefactsreportcover

Just the Facts about Sexual Orientation and Youth: A Primer for Principals, Educators and School Personnel [downloadble]

justthefactsreportcoverThe American Psychological Association and the other 12 organizations that comprise the Just the Facts Coalition have just published a new edition of “Just the Facts about Sexual Orientation and Youth: A Primer for Principals, Educators, and School Personnel“.

This booklet is intended to provide principals, educators, and school personnel with accurate information that will help them respond to a recent upsurge in promotion of efforts to change sexual orientation through therapy and religious ministries. This upsurge has been coupled with a demand that these perspectives on homosexuality be given equal time in schools. Read more ›

genderexpressreport

Health Risk Behaviors among Gender Expansive Students (downloadable)

genderexpressreport

Young people whose gender expression does not fit traditional roles based on their sex assigned at birth—often referred to as gender nonconforming, gender expansive, or nonbinary youth—are at increased risk for a variety of health risk behaviors. Research on gender nonconformity among sexual minority youth has shown that such youth face an increased risk of victimization (bullying, abuse, sexual harassment) and worse behavioral health outcomes (depression, suicide, drug use) compared to their peers. Read more ›

1 2