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Resources Tagged With: school

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Perfect Grades Don’t Always Matter [video]

Most American students strive for a 4.0 GPA and the highest test scores, but research shows that this quest for perfection actually discourages creativity and reduces academic risk-taking. In this episode of “School Myths” author Alice Roth of The Atlantic investigates why grades aren’t everything when it comes to education. Read more ›

SEL brief elementary school

Social Emotional Learning in Elementary School [downloadable]

SEL brief elementary schoolSocial and Emotional Learning in Elementary School, produced by Pennsylvania State University with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, examines the evidence of successful, universal SEL programs and practices used to support social and emotional development in students during the elementary years (K-5). Read more ›

SEL brief middle and HS

Promoting Social and Emotional Learning in the Middle and High School Years [downloadable]

SEL brief middle and HSPromoting Social and Emotional Learning in the Middle and High School Years, produced by Pennsylvania State University with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, provides an overview of frameworks that define social emotional competence, and reviews the current landscape of universal school-based programs designed to promote its growth in middle and high school students. Read more ›

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Educators Employ Strategies To Help Kids With Anxiety Return To School

little-boy-hiding1635065_640The Anxiety and Depression Association of America estimates anxiety-based school refusal affects 2 to 5 percent of school-age children. It is often triggered when students are transitioning into middle or high school. Doctors say it should be treated with flexibility and therapy – not punishment. Read more ›

anxious child in class

20 Tips to Help De-escalate Interactions with Anxious or Defiant Students

anxious child in classStudents’ behavior is a form of communication and when it’s negative it almost always stems from an underlying cause. There are many reasons kids might be acting out, which makes it difficult for a teacher in a crowded classroom to figure out the root cause. But even if there was time and space to do so, most teachers receive very little training in behavior during their credentialing programs. Read more ›

Overcoming

Approaching Struggles with Enthusiasm

OvercomingStudents will flourish and students will struggle. It’s the nature of the classroom beast. Some will announce their achievements proudly and others prefer to brush their uncertainty under the rug. Regardless, the purpose of the educator(s) in the room is to ensure that all students grow from their personal place of knowing, whether they are a confident bloomer or struggling little bird learning to fly. When the struggle is real, opportunities must be in place so that all learners can approach struggles with enthusiasm. Read more ›

edutopia

Edutopia: Evidence-Based Practices and Strategies for K-12 Educators [web resource]

edutopiaFunded by the George Lucas Educational FoundationEd utopia is dedicated to transforming kindergarten through 12th-grade (K-12) education so all students can thrive in their studies, careers, and adult lives. Their focus is on the practices and programs that help students acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes, skills and beliefs to achieve their full potential.

Edutopia offers a range of resources to help educators implement the core strategies aimed at “empowering students to think critically, access and analyze information, creatively problem solve, work collaboratively, and communicate with clarity and impact.” Read more ›

colorful-brain

Five Myths About Transgender Students Educators Need to Unlearn

colorful-brainDr. Laura Erickson-Schroth, a psychiatrist working with LGBT people in New York City, is the co-author, with Laura A. Jacobs, of the recently published ‘You’re in the Wrong Bathroom!’ and 20 Other Myths and Misconceptions About Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming People.

In an article published in Education Week, she writes, “…Most schools have no formal rules around gender inclusion and do not address gender identity in curricula. Because of this, many K-12 educators have difficulty knowing how to begin talking with students about gender identity.” Read more ›

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ADHD: The Pros and Cons of a “Medication Holiday”

child-beachWritten by Dr. Glen Elliott, CHC Chief Psychiatrist and Medical Director

Summer checklist: Sunblock…check. Beach towels…check. Medication…uncheck?

During the school year, many children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) use medications—especially stimulants such as methylphenidate (e.g., Ritalin, Concerta, Focalin) or amphetamine (e.g., Adderall, Vyvanse)—to increase focus and attention span and decrease restlessness and impulsivity. This is especially true for children who have both high activity levels and impulsivity found with combined-type ADHD (ADHD-C) but may also be the case for the primarily inattentive type of ADHD (ADHD-I). Because stimulants provide symptom relief soon after taking them but are out of the system by the end of the day, there is the option of taking a “medication holiday” over the summer. But what are the pros and cons? Read more ›

dyslexia

Unidentified Dyslexia Takes Heavy Toll

student photoThe National Institutes of Health estimates that between 6 percent and 17 percent of school-age children have some form of dyslexia, although not all of those students may have been identified by their schools.

Anyone who has taught a dyslexic student has observed that dyslexia, typically considered a reading disability, affects other areas of learning. It makes spelling difficult. It makes writing difficult. It can even make memorizing math facts difficult. It simply makes school difficult—every day and in every way. Read more ›

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