Emergency Phone Numbers24-hr Crisis Lines: 855.278.4204 (Santa Clara) | 650.579.0350 (San Mateo) | 415.781.0500 (San Francisco) | 800.273.8255 or Text BAY to 741-741 (National)

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Resource Center for Families & Educators

Learn more

Social Emotional Learning

Building Trauma-Sensitive Schools — Online Training for Educators [web resource] [downloadable]

Schools play a significant role in supporting the health and well-being of children and youth, including those affected by traumatic experiences. In a trauma-sensitive school, all aspects of the educational environment—from workforce training to engagement with students and families to procedures and policies—are grounded in an understanding of trauma and its impact and are designed to promote resilience for all. Read more ›

The Role Social-Emotional Learning Plays in Teaching White Children About Race

When you grow up white in America, you learn that you are simply American. If you’re not white, you learn that you have to qualify your identity: African American, Asian American, Latin American. Children pick this up at a very young age. Non-white children figure out that they are different, they are “other,” they are not the standard; the world was not designed for them. White children learn the opposite—that they are at the center and that others are defined by their difference. Read more ›

What Does it Mean to be Anti-Racist? [web resource] [video]

Anti-racism is a term that’s been around for awhile but has been appearing more in conversations lately. It’s the idea that people of all races, but especially white people, need to step up when they see explicit or structural racism. So, what are you doing in your schools or communities to combat racism? Or what do you want to do? Read more ›

How Parents Can Help Shy and Introverted Kids Through a Particularly Tough Back-to-School Season

As school starts up again in whatever form, how can we support kids’ social development — particularly for those who were already struggling? Here are some suggestions from experts. Read more ›

Time to Ditch ‘Toxic Positivity,’ Experts Say: ‘It’s Okay Not to Be Okay’

In the midst of a raging pandemic and widespread social unrest, these days it can feel as if reassuring platitudes are inescapable.

“Everything will be fine.”
“It could be worse.”
“Look on the bright side.”

But as well intentioned as those who lean on such phrases may be, experts are cautioning against going overboard with the “good vibes only” trend. Too much forced positivity is not just unhelpful, they say — it’s toxic. Read more ›

Four Ways to Help Kids Cope With the Uncertainty of the New School Year

While some students thrived during distance learning in the spring, many others struggled with the format or with other challenges, such as concerns about safety, family finances or health. Whatever form school takes, here are four ways parents and educators can help children cope with change and uncertainty as we face the new school year. Read more ›

Remote Learning SEL Resources for Parents, Families and Caregivers [downloadable]

Promoting SEL at Home is a series of developmentally appropriate social and emotional learning (SEL) resources for parents, families, and caregivers to use at home. These lesson ideas facilitate the development of SEL skills in children, from infancy through high school. Read more ›

Highly Sensitive Children Thrive in the Right Environment

Sensitive children are keen observers of the world, but tend to get overstimulated. They often live intense inner lives and are highly creative, but they are wary of new situations and of people they don’t know.

They also easily intuit the moods of others and feel their pain. This empathy draws their peers and sometimes even adults to confide in sensitive children. Later in life, they often go into helping professions like health care and counseling, where their natural gifts are put to good use. Read more ›

Not Sure What You’re Feeling? Journaling Can Help

Expressive writing is associated with improvements in physical health, improvements in markers of mental health, and improvements in immune function. It’s also been shown to improve working memory in college students, says James Pennebaker, a professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Read more ›

Showing Up For Yourself

Prioritizing your needs is important, Rachel Wilkerson Miller says, but it’s often easier said than done. “Most people think that is true for everybody who is not them. And they sort of think that they’re the exception to the rule.”

Miller is the author of The Art of Showing Up: How to Be There for Yourself and Your People, a new book in which she stresses that you can’t fully show up for the people in your life until you know how to do the same for yourself. Read more ›

1 2 3 22