Emergency Phone Numbers24-hr Crisis Lines: 855.278.4204 (Santa Clara) | 650.579.0350 (San Mateo) | 415.781.0500 (San Francisco) | 800.273.8255 or Text BAY to 741-741 (National)

CHC During Shelter-in-Place: Services Are Available!

Learn more

Speech & Language Development

Is This Normal? Top 5 Things to Know About Your Young Child’s Development

Written by Melanie Hsu, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist and Early Childhood Program Manager at CHC

Many parents note that one silver lining of these scary and unprecedented times is the opportunity to spend much more time with their children. However, this increased attention can sometimes lead to more worries: is my child delayed? Are they reacting to the anxiety of these times? Or am I just more concerned and sensitive because of my own personal stress? Read more ›

Developing Lifelong Learners [video]

If you’re a parent and want your children to develop into lifelong learners, there are a range of things that you can do. The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development created a video series in which NICHD experts provide tips on how to encourage lifelong learning in your children using math, language, and reading skills. Read more ›

Reading Tips for Parents (in Multiple Languages) [downloable]

A child’s success as a reader begins much earlier than the first day of school. Reading, and a love for reading, begins at home. Reading Rockets’ one-page parent tips offer easy ways for parents to help kids become successful readers. Read more ›

As We Grow…Key Developmental Milestones Ages 1-18 [downloadable]

At each age in a child’s life, there are predictable levels of skill to expect. We have outlined the developmental milestones for ages 1 to 18—a checklist you can use as you observe your child growing up, and a guide to use with your pediatrician or your child’s teacher. Read more ›

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Learn the Signs and Symptoms [downloadable]

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder that affects communication and behavior. Although autism can be diagnosed at any age, it is described as a “developmental disorder” because symptoms generally appear in the first two years of life. Read more ›

Preventing Bullying [downloadable]

Bullying is a form of youth violence. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines bullying as any unwanted aggressive behavior(s) by another youth or group of youths, who are not siblings or current dating partners, that involves an observed or perceived power imbalance and is repeated multiple times or is highly likely to be repeated. Bullying may inflict harm or distress on the targeted youth including physical, psychological, social, or educational harm. Read more ›

First 5 Santa Clara County [web resource] [downloadable]

FIRST 5 Santa Clara County supports the healthy development of children, from prenatal through age 5, and enriches the lives of their families and communities.

Read more ›

Early Childhood Language Development Resources [downloadable]

Kids start developing communication skills from the moment they’re born. Newborns quickly begin to recognize important sounds in their environment, such as their parents’ voices. As they grow, babies start recognizing the sounds that form language, such as the way syllables, words, and sentences work. Read more ›

speech and language 604

Speech and Language Developmental Milestones

speech and language 604How do speech and language develop?

The first 3 years of life, when the brain is developing and maturing, is the most intensive period for acquiring speech and language skills. These skills develop best in a world that is rich with sounds, sights, and consistent exposure to the speech and language of others. Read more ›

vroom 598

Vroom: Brain-Building Activities [web resource]

vroom 598Simple interactions between you and your children help build children’s brains foundation for all future learning. Vroom is a set of tools and resources designed to inspire families to turn everyday moments into “brain building moments” by layering activities that are essential to healthy brain development onto existing routines. Read more ›

1 2 3 5