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Suicide Awareness & Prevention

Suicidal Thoughts Are Increasing in Young Kids

While suicidal thoughts and self-harm have been well documented in teenagers, mental health experts say too little attention has been paid to young children, despite growing evidence that more elementary and middle school students are in crisis. Read more ›

My Mental Health: Do I Need Help? [downloadable]

First, determine how much your symptoms interfere with your daily life.  This fact sheet from the National Institute of Mental Health offers some guidance and next steps. Read more ›

How To Talk — And Listen — To A Teen With Mental Health Struggles

There’s not much solid data on this, but some clinicians, like Dr. Booth Watkins and Elisa Nebolsine, a cognitive behavioral therapist in Falls Church, Va., say that the levels of distress, including suicidality, in their adolescent patients is among the highest they’ve seen in their careers. Nebolsine says that’s because the pandemic is making it hard for teenagers to meet basic developmental needs. Read more ›

DBT: One Parent’s Journey

Currently, Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is the only well-established, evidence-based treatment for self-harming adolescents at high risk for suicide. In this podcast episode, hear one mom’s brave story of helping her teenage daughter through panic attacks, PTSD and self-harming behaviors using DBT skills like mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness and communication, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance. We are so grateful that she is willing to share her life-changing journey with us. Read more ›

Computerized Screening May Help Identify Youth at Risk for Suicide

Suicide rates for adolescents have risen over the past two decades. In 2019, nearly 1,600 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 died by suicide. Only about 40% of adolescents who die by suicide have been treated for a mental health concern. To help ensure that at-risk youth receive help, it is important to screen broadly for suicide risk. Read more ›

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Fact Sheet [downloadable]

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a type of cognitive-behavioral therapy. DBT was originally developed in the 1980s by Marsha Linehan, a psychologist at the University of Washington. Although initially intended to help chronically suicidal individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD, DBT has since been adapted for and used to effectively treat a number of other psychological problems. Read more ›

How To Help Someone At Risk Of Suicide

The pandemic has taken a heavy emotional toll on many people, and if you know someone struggling with despair, depression or thoughts of suicide, you may be wondering how to help. Read more ›

Pandemic Depression Is About to Collide With Seasonal Depression. Make a Plan, Experts Say.

The American Psychological Association has seen a sharp increase in suicidal ideation, particularly among young adults, during the pandemic, according to Vaile Wright, senior director of health-care innovation.

But the coming winter months will probably complicate how people are experiencing depression, whether they also suffer from SAD or not, experts say. Read more ›

Bipolar Disorder in Teens and Young Adults: Know the Signs [downloadable]

Bipolar disorder is a mental disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, marked by episodes of mania and depression. Bipolar disorder is not the same as the typical ups and downs every kid goes through. The mood swings are more extreme and accompanied by changes in sleep, energy level, and the ability to think clearly. Know the signs and symptoms. Read more ›

Virtual Signs of Serious Mental Health Problems: A Teacher’s Guide to Protecting Students

With much of education being delivered in a virtual environment during the pandemic, monitoring students’ mental health is harder, but more critical than ever. Some of the same indicators of distress apply as much in the virtual classroom as in the physical one, such as difficulty participating in class, poor attendance, frequently reporting illness and not completing assignments. But other indicators, such as on-screen interactions with family members and turning off the camera, are new to distance learning. Read more ›

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