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Resources Tagged With: downloadable

CDC Tool Helps Parents Weigh the Benefits and Risks of Sending Their Children Back to School [downloadable]

Choosing whether or not to send your child back to school can be difficult. When weighing decisions about your child returning to school, it is important to consider your family’s unique needs and situation and your comfort level with the steps your school is taking to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Read more ›

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Fact Sheet [downloadable]

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a type of cognitive-behavioral therapy. DBT was originally developed in the 1980s by Marsha Linehan, a psychologist at the University of Washington. Although initially intended to help chronically suicidal individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD, DBT has since been adapted for and used to effectively treat a number of other psychological problems. Read more ›

Distance Learning Toolkit: Key Practices to Support Students Who Learn Differently [downloadable]

During the COVID-19 pandemic, distance learning has been a challenge for many educators, families, and students. That includes the 1 in 5 students who learn differently.

A new toolkit — developed in partnership between Understood and the National Center for Learning Disabilities — can help educators meet the needs of all students at this critical moment. Read more ›

Stop. Think. Connect. Cybersecurity Campaign [web resource] [downloadable]

The STOP.THINK.CONNECT.™ Campaign is a national public awareness campaign with the goal of helping Americans to be safer and more secure online. Read more ›

Gifted and Dyslexic: Identifying and Instructing the Twice Exceptional Student [downloadable]

As individuals, each of us has a unique combination of strengths and weaknesses. But sometimes we are exceptionally strong or weak in certain areas. In the school setting, students with exceptional strengths and weaknesses may have different instructional needs than other students. Twice exceptional or 2e is a term used to describe students who are both intellectually gifted (as determined by an accepted standardized assessment) and learning disabled, which includes students with dyslexia. Read more ›

Teens and College Students — Find Help for Anxiety [web resource] [downloadable]

Teens and college students can easily feel anxious trying to juggle school, work, friends, and family while trying to figure out the rest of your life. Most of us bounce back. But frequent, intense, and uncontrollable anxiety that interferes with your daily routines may be a sign of an anxiety disorder. Read more ›

Starting the Conversation: College and Your Mental Health [downloadable] [video]

To help put a thoughtful plan into place should a mental health condition arise, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and The Jed Foundation have created a guide to help start the conversation. It offers both parents and students the opportunity to learn more about mental health, including what the privacy laws are and how mental health information can be shared. Read more ›

COVID-19 Vaccines Are Here — What You Need to Know [web resource] [downloadable]

COVID-19 vaccination is one of the most important tools to end the COVID-19 pandemic. California is prioritizing vaccines for equitable distribution to everyone who wants it. The state expects to have enough supplies to vaccinate most Californians in all 58 counties by summer 2021. Read more ›

Talking to Children About Violence: Tips for Parents and Teachers [downloadable]

High profile acts of violence, particularly in schools, can confuse and frighten children who may feel in danger or worry that their friends or loved-ones are at risk. They will look to adults for information and guidance on how to react. Parents and school personnel can help children feel safe by establishing a sense of normalcy and security and talking with them about their fears. The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) has developed recommendations for talking about protests, unsettling information and violent events. Read more ›

10 Tips for Teaching and Talking to Kids About Race [downloadable]

These tips, developed by EmbraceRace in partnership with MomsRising, are designed to help parents of all backgrounds talk to and guide their children about race early and often by lifting up age-appropriate activities that can be incorporated easily into your daily life. Read more ›

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