Emergency Phone Numbers24-hr Crisis Lines: 855.278.4204 (Santa Clara) | 650.579.0350 (San Mateo) | 415.781.0500 (San Francisco) | 800.273.8255 or Text BAY to 741-741 (National)

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Resource Center for Families & Educators

Learn more

Resources Tagged With: parenting

How White Parents Can Talk To Their Kids About Race

The recent unrest sparked by anger over police brutality against African Americans has parents who aren’t black thinking more about how they talk to their kids about race. Read more ›

Parenting: Talking Race With Young Children

Even babies notice differences like skin color, eye shape and hair texture. Here’s how to handle conversations about race, racism, diversity and inclusion, even with very young children. Read more ›

Supporting Individuals with Autism through Uncertain Times — COVID-19 Toolkit [downloadable]

All children and young adults require support from caregivers during times of stress and uncertainty, such as those we are facing now with the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19).

Coping with the unknown and navigating school closures, abrupt changes in routines, loss of connections with teachers and friends, and fear around contracting the virus- are burdens for all, and caregivers play an important role in helping children and young adults understand the changes and process their related feelings. Read more ›

Diverse Bookfinder — Identify and Explore Multicultural Picture Books [web resource]

Diverse BookFinder (DBF) is a comprehensive collection of children’s picture books featuring Black and Indigenous people and People of Color (BIPOC). Read more ›

Healthy Friendships in Adolescence

Positive social connections with people at all stages in life help ensure healthy development, physically, socially, and emotionally. As children transition to adolescence and start to spend less time with parents and siblings, friendships with peers become an increasingly important source of these social connections. Read more ›

Tips for Choosing Picture Books Featuring Diverse, BIPOC Characters

If you’re an adult who understands the importance of seeking out picture books that feature Black and Indigenous people and People of Color (BIPOC), it can still be challenging to know how to choose a good book from among what’s available on the “diverse books” market. Read more ›

Taking the Time to Listen [presentation] [video]

Are you finding it difficult to get your teen to talk with you? It seems like communication would be easier since you’re all at home together, but the reality is different. Maybe it’s time to stop talking to them and start listening. In this webinar, learn about the social development of adolescents as well as strategies you can use to truly listen to and connect with your child. Read more ›

The Reading Place: Where Stories Take Root [video]

Reading is a great way keep young children engaged and provide them an opportunity to continue to learn and grow when they are not in school.  For those times when you are not able to sit down and read a book to your youngster, check out The Reading Place, an online series of children’s book read-alouds hosted by the Santa Clara County Office of Education (SCCOE). Read more ›

Talking With Your Teen: Questions & Answers

Adolescence is a time of enormous change, physically, emotionally and socially. It is a difficult time for many parents. Young people say that they WANT to talk to their parents about sexuality, especially about values and relationships. They believe their parents’ opinion is important and they would like to be able to go to them when they have questions. If parents show they are open and willing to talk about these topics, teens will ask. Read more ›

Conversation Tools for Talking With Teens

Every parent of a teen has experienced it: that rare moment when your teen opens up and shares information with you about his or her life. It’s a joy.

But every parent also knows that much of the time, talking to a teen can be a bit of a struggle. In fact, parents often think that teens don’t listen and what a parent says doesn’t matter. Read more ›

1 2 3 4 5 42