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Resources Tagged With: teens

Colleges Can Be Covid-19 Hotspots. Here’s How to Talk to Your Kid About Safety.

Despite parents’ efforts to prepare their children and the extensive safety protocols set up by colleges and universities, the novel coronavirus has infiltrated campuses nationwide, turning many into covid-19 hot spots in just a matter of weeks. With cases continuing to rise, forcing switches to online-only classes and strict dorm lockdowns, parents have found themselves trying to figure out how to communicate their concerns from afar. Read more ›

Healthy Friendships in Adolescence

Positive social connections with people at all stages in life help ensure healthy development, physically, socially, and emotionally. As children transition to adolescence and start to spend less time with parents and siblings, friendships with peers become an increasingly important source of these social connections. Read more ›

Talking With Your Teen: Questions & Answers

Adolescence is a time of enormous change, physically, emotionally and socially. It is a difficult time for many parents. Young people say that they WANT to talk to their parents about sexuality, especially about values and relationships. They believe their parents’ opinion is important and they would like to be able to go to them when they have questions. If parents show they are open and willing to talk about these topics, teens will ask. Read more ›

Conversation Tools for Talking With Teens

Every parent of a teen has experienced it: that rare moment when your teen opens up and shares information with you about his or her life. It’s a joy.

But every parent also knows that much of the time, talking to a teen can be a bit of a struggle. In fact, parents often think that teens don’t listen and what a parent says doesn’t matter. Read more ›

Survey: Pandemic Caused Teens to Experience ‘Collective Trauma’ [downloadable]

More than three-fourths of 13- to 19-year-olds have been showing up for online classes at least four days a week, but they’re generally spending less time on learning than if they were in school, according to the results of a nationally representative survey of 3,300 high school students. The results were released Friday by America’s Promise Alliance and its research institute, the Center for Promise at Boston University. Read more ›

Anxiety Screening Recommended for All Females Ages 13 and Up

Young women ages 13 and up should be screened for anxiety at routine visits, according to a new Women’s Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI) recommendation. Read more ›

Study Finds Rising Rate of Mental Health Visits Among Youth to Emergency Departments

While the number of pediatric emergency department (ED) visits across the nation has remained stable over the last 10 years, visits for mental health disorders have risen 60% and the rate of visits for deliberate self-harm have increased 329%. Read more ›

Anywhere USA: Addressing the Teen Mental Health Epidemic

Written by Dawn Foreman, coordinator of marketing, communications and community engagement for the Cambrian School District in San Jose

By seventh grade, Zachary Nimmo had meticulously mapped out his future to the tiniest detail — take every engineering course offered at Amador Valley High School in Pleasanton, attend Las Positas Community College for two years, transfer to Cal Poly to earn an engineering degree, then move to Seattle. His friends called him a hybrid — an excellent soccer and lacrosse athlete and a self-proclaimed geek — passionate about computers, coding and comic books. But something started to change in eighth grade, and his parents were concerned with his darkening behavior. Read more ›

With Senior Year In Disarray, Teens And Young Adults Feel Lost. Here’s How To Help

For many young people sheltering at home means missing milestones and public recognition of their achievements. This is especially true for seniors graduating from high school and college. Read more ›

Why the Preteen Years Are a Critical Period for Brain Development

Aside from experiencing physical changes, preteens also undergo a brain growth spurt much like toddlers. Ron Dahl, who directs the Institute for Human Development at the University of California, Berkeley, argues that adolescence is actually a second opportunity to invest in children because of the enormous brain development during this period. Read more ›

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