Resources Tagged With: Voices of Compassion

Isolation & Loneliness

Nearly half of Americans report feeling left out or alone, and over two-thirds of teens report being lonely. Research shows that loneliness and social isolation are twice as harmful to physical and mental health as obesity. But did you know that even just one friend can be enough? Read more ›

When a Child Won’t Go to School

School avoidance has become a major issue, exacerbated by long periods of distance learning and isolation. What causes school avoidance? How does it show up in kids and how can parents effectively support their children in getting back to the classroom? Read more ›

Back to School: Balancing Academic and Social-Emotional Wellness

Social-emotional health is fundamental to life and learning: in fact, research shows that it is a greater predictor of academic success than IQ. As our kids head back to school, we are mindful of what they have been through in the past few years and the youth mental health crisis in our midst. Read more ›

Recipe for Resilience – Especially for Mental Health Professionals

In proud partnership with Common Ground, a locally renowned speaker series for over 15,000 families in over 40 schools, we are excited to bring you this Voices of Compassion podcast episode. While Common Ground is primarily a parent education consortium, this conversation is specifically targeted to mental health professionals in schools and beyond. Read more ›

How to Talk With Teens About Mental Health

Between 2009 and 2019, the percentage of teens who reported having “persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness” rose from 26 percent to 37 percent and, in 2021, to 44 percent. Further, research shows that 1 in 5 youth in distress felt that they didn’t have someone they could turn to in a crisis. How can we let our teens know we’re here for them and protect them from significant mental health challenges? Read more ›

Parenting: Developing Self-Awareness

​We often talk about building self-awareness in our kids, but what about in ourselves, as parents and caregivers?

The better we understand our own complexities, the more wholeheartedly we can show up for our children. In fact, research shows that when a parent understands themselves better, the child has better overall life outcomes. Read more ›

Can My School Aged Child Really Be Depressed?

Children often experience a rollercoaster of emotions, even on a good day. But prolonged symptoms of sadness, irritability, short-temper, change in eating or sleeping habits or lost concentration or interest could be signs of depression. How do you know what’s normal and what’s cause for concern? Read more ›

Launching: Transition Age Youth

Growing up is a process of moving toward independence, becoming your own person and meeting your own needs. “Launching” refers to the parental role in their child’s transition into adulthood. This process looks different for everyone — a bumpier or more meandering path for some than others. So how can you best prepare your child for a smooth launch? Read more ›

I Just Learned My Child Has Autism — Now What?

The CDC and National Health Statistics Reports estimate that there is a 1-2% chance of a child being diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and the rates for boys are higher than that for girls. So, if your child has just been diagnosed with autism, you are not alone. Read more ›

Understanding Anxiety: What is Typical and What Is Not

Anxiety is a healthy emotion, except when it’s not. Experiencing anxiety can be just what we need to finish a project or task, or deal with a stressful situation. But it can also be overwhelming and debilitating. Read more ›

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