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Children's Health Council

News related to: reading

Research: Exploring the Link Between Childhood Curiosity and School Achievement

The more curious the child, the more likely he or she may be to perform better in school — regardless of economic background — suggests a new study published in Pediatric Research. Read more ›

CHC in the Press: Volunteer Tutors Provide Struggling Kids with Social-Emotional Stability and Academic Help

More than 2,000 students are served by All Students Matter, a volunteer-driven nonprofit providing literacy, math and social-emotional support to elementary school students in the Ravenswood City School District. All Students Matter received $5,000 from the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund this year, paying for new volunteer training that the organization’s founder described as “invaluable.”

As All Students Matter has grown — from 15 people informally volunteering in one Ravenswood school 10 years ago to more than 200 volunteers at six schools — so have the needs of the students it serves. This is reflected in the revamped training, which now consists of one hour focused on literacy and, new last year, one hour on social-emotional support. Read more ›

Universal Dyslexia Screening Improves Odds of Success in School

The Dyslexia Research Institute reports that “dyslexics have an inherited neurological difference, resulting in language, perceptual, processing, and attention/concentration differences. Since this issue affects so much of a child’s educational experience beyond just reading, it makes sense to identify and address dyslexia in students as early as possible. Doing so may not only improve the child’s chances of success in school, but may also improve the chance of other students in the classroom who may be affected by the attention an undiagnosed dyslexic student requires. Read more ›

How Reading Aloud to Therapy Dogs Can Help Struggling Kids

While many people are familiar with therapeutic pets and how they can help lift up people’s spirits, bringing them into the classroom might sound far-fetched. How can a therapy pet possibly teach children the life lessons of kindness and empathy? Can a pet really alter the way that students feel about learning? Read more ›

Tech-Based Interventions Can Help Students with Dyslexia Read Without Frustration

Leslie Patterson said she knew nothing about dyslexia when she first became an elementary school teacher. Now, the certified academic language therapist and licensed dyslexia teacher at Griffis Elementary School in Caddo Mills, Texas, is leading the way in using technology to help some of her dyslexic students develop a love for reading.

Using Bookshare, which, with 480,000 books is the world’s largest digital library, Patterson is helping her students access books they can read, using their eyes and ears, by listening to and seeing highlighted text. Read more ›

Digital Tools Aim to Personalize Literacy Instruction

From online news articles written at five different reading levels to algorithms that create personalized vocabulary lists, ed-tech tools are rapidly expanding the ways in which teachers can differentiate their literacy and reading instruction.

Experts say the new technologies have the potential to transform learning, one child at a time.  Bernadette Dwyer a board member of the International Literacy Association says, “The problem up to this point is that when we’ve designed curriculum, we’ve done it with a mythical ‘average student’ in mind, then tried to fix the curriculum after the fact to address the needs of particular children, but digital tools can help us anticipate the needs of children upfront, particularly for struggling readers.” Read more ›

Early Intervention in Dyslexia Can Narrow Achievement Gap

Identifying children with dyslexia as early as first grade could narrow or even close the achievement gap with typical readers, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Davis, and Yale University.

The data indicate that it is no longer acceptable to wait until a child is in third grade or later before undertaking efforts to identify or address dyslexia. Read more ›

Parents’ Club of Palo Alto and Menlo Park Publishes Article by Sonali Bhagat, MS, CCC-SLP, and Mae Carlson, MS, CCC-SLP

The Parents’ Club of Palo Alto and Menlo Park (PAMP) is the largest parent organization on the Peninsula. PAMP members extend up and down the Peninsula, to San Francisco Bay Area, and South Bay. Their mission is to enrich the lives of families with young children, by providing resources, support and community in Palo Alto, Menlo Park and the surrounding areas.

Children’s Health Council’s Sonali Bhagat, MS, CCC-SLP, and Mae Carlson, MS, CCC-SLP wrote “Raising a Bright Reader: Playtime for Reading Comprehension,” for PAMP’s online article repository.

Read more ›