Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

Why Is It Important to Talk About Race and Racism?

When we teach kids early on that it’s OK to talk about race, we help them to understand, respect, and appreciate the differences between people. This builds empathy and compassion for others so that kids are better able to see when things in their world seem unjust or unfair — and can do something about it. Read more ›

It’s Never Too Early to Talk With Children About Race

Infants as young as six months old can recognize differences in skin color. By age two and a half, research has shown, children prefer playmates who are similar in race and gender. And as early as age three, they are forming judgments about people based on racial differences.

What children learn, hear, and witness from family members, friends, and others in their communities about race plays a major role in how they view people who are different from them, according to Yale experts. Read more ›

Students of Color in Special Education Are Less Likely to Get the Help They Need – Here Are 3 Ways Teachers Can Do Better

When I was a special education teacher, my colleagues and I recommended that a Black girl receive special education services because she had difficulty reading. However, her mother disagreed. When I asked her why, she explained that she, too, was identified as having a learning disability when she was a student. Read more ›

BIPOC Mental Health Trends and Disparities

Even though mental health experiences are unique to each person, there are a few trends within the BIPOC community that highlight similar disparities and barriers throughout each ethnic group. Read more ›

Black Girls With Disabilities: Pushed Out, Unsupported, Struggling to Learn [video]

From inadequate educational experiences to constant, harmful disciplinary practices, school is a harmful place for many Black girls with disabilities. The National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD) in conjunction with The Education Trust interviewed two Young Adult Leadership Council (YALC) members about their experiences in school as Black girls with learning disabilities. Read more ›

Assistive Technology Tools for Learning Differences, ADHD, and Executive Function Challenges [web resource]

For many students with differing abilities, assistive technology provides a bridge to overcome barriers to participation and progress in school. Read more ›

Youth, Disclosure, and the Workplace Why, When, What, and How

Every job seeker with a disability is faced with the same decision: “Should I or shouldn’t I disclose my disability?” This decision may be framed differently depending upon whether you have a visible disability or a non-visible disability. Ultimately, the decision of whether to disclose is entirely up to you. Read more ›

Disability Disclosure and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

Deciding if, when, and how to share disability-related information with a prospective or current employer can be overwhelming. The decision-making process requires answering a number of personal questions that may be different with each employment experience. Read more ›

Free Guidance on Job Accommodations and Disability Employment Issues [web resource] [video]

Serving customers across the United States and around the world for more than 35 years, the Job Accommodation Network (JAN) is the leading source of free, expert, and confidential guidance on job accommodations and disability employment issues. Read more ›

Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education

More and more high school students with disabilities are planning to continue their education in postsecondary schools, including vocational and career schools, two- and four- year colleges, and universities.

As a student with a disability, you need to be well informed about your rights and responsibilities as well as the responsibilities postsecondary schools have toward you. Read more ›

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