Emergency Phone Numbers24-hr Crisis Lines: 855.278.4204 (Santa Clara) | 650.579.0350 (San Mateo) | 415.781.0500 (San Francisco) | 800.273.8255 or Text BAY to 741-741 (National)

Resources Tagged With: school

In a San Francisco High School, the Scars of Remote Schooling Linger

The damage wrought by over 18 months away from classrooms lingers at Burton, a high-poverty school in a high-wealth city, overlooking the whole of San Francisco from a hilly peak in the southeast corner of the city. Burton — the students who rely on it and the teachers who power it — is a study both in joy and in enduring trauma, a place where everything seems normal, but nothing is quite as it should be. Read more ›

Positive Parenting: Adjust Your Parenting Strategies for Kids With ADHD

Your child’s bad behavior is not personal. Make ADHD the enemy; not your child. Catch your child being good every day. Stop blaming others. And other rules for parenting a child with ADD that every family needs to hear.

To ensure that your child is happy and well-adjusted now and in the future — and to create a tranquil home environment — you’ve got to be a great parent to a child with ADHD. Here’s what works, and why. Read more ›

School Changes – Helping Children With ADHD

Many children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) struggle with school. Recently, children have faced a variety of changes in the way that they attend school. Some might be attending virtual classes; others might attend school in-person with many new rules. To help your child with ADHD adjust to these changes, learn about the resources available for parents. Read more ›

School Bullying Has Decreased During the COVID-19 Pandemic, but Schools Should Prepare for Its Return

Remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic interrupted many facets of students’ school experiences. Although many parents, educators, and other stakeholders have sounded the alarm on the potential negative learning and mental health outcomes, the shift to virtual schooling may have also benefited some students—particularly those who have experienced bullying by their peers. Read more ›

Schwab Learning Center at CHC

7 Things to Know About College Disability Services

If your child has had an IEP or a 504 plan in high school, you’ve been able to play a role in the process. You’ve had access to the people who are providing supports and services. And you’ve been able to monitor how well those supports are being implemented. Read more ›

Colleges & Careers: Deciding to Opt In or Out of High-Stakes Tests

For prospective students and professionals who want to pursue certain degrees and careers, high-stakes tests will often be necessary.

For those with a learning disability or another disability, testing accommodations are available. Accommodations that can be requested often include distraction-free rooms, extra time, assistive readers, use of a calculator, and more. The use of accommodations is kept confidential, so colleges and employers will not know if someone has a learning disability or used testing accommodations unless the individual discloses it. Read more ›

College Students with ADHD

Most people with ADHD are diagnosed before college. However, some people may not recognize the signs and symptoms of ADHD until they are at college. Trying to balance school work and the freedom of living away from home for the first time may be challenging. Read more ›

Succeeding in College with ADHD [video]

Heading off to college and wondering how you’ll cope with your ADHD symptoms? First, know that you are not alone. Plenty of people who have ADHD or its symptoms have succeeded in college. That includes learning how to deal with issues of time management, emotional and social well-being, focusing in class, doing homework, and taking tests. Read more ›

My Teen Struggles with Executive Function

It was January 2021. Our son Jack’s second term as a freshman in high school had just ended. Two weeks earlier, my husband and I scanned the school’s database to check his grades. We counted more than 20 missing assignments.

A bright, conscientious, and capable teen, Jack had often struggled with organization and procrastination, especially with research and writing assignments. Read more ›

1 2 3 54