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Resources Tagged With: suicide prevention

Safe Spaces for Teens Aren’t Controversial, They’re Critical. Here’s Why.

When the researchers Carl Hanson and Quinn Snell set out to identify the top 10 factors that predicted suicidal thoughts and behavior in 179,000 Utah high school students, they had no preconceived notions. Instead, they fed years worth of survey responses from those teens, who’d answered questions about things like school involvement, family life, and mental health, into 100 different machine learning models, eager to let the data lead them to a conclusion. Read more ›

Colleges Are Turning to Science to Limit Suicide Contagion and Help Heal Campuses

Just as there’s research on how to prevent mental health crises and interventions for people who are actively suicidal, research is also developing around the effective steps that can be taken after a suicide to help communities grieve, restore a sense of stability and limit the risk of more deaths. Read more ›

California Joins Other States With Laws Limiting Wait Times for Mental Health Issues

Many Americans with mental illness report waiting weeks for care, even for serious depression or suicidality. California has a new law for insurers, limiting those wait times to two weeks or less. Read more ›

Pediatricians Say the Mental Health Crisis Among Kids Has Become a National Emergency

A coalition of the nation’s leading experts in pediatric health has issued an urgent warning declaring the mental health crisis among children so dire that it has become a national emergency. Read more ›

Teen Suicide: What Parents Need to Know

It can be hard to imagine talking with your teen about suicide. But given that it is the second leading cause of death among young people, it makes sense to be prepared to have that conversation. How can we as parents create a safe, nonjudgmental space where our teens feel comfortable talking about hard things? Read more ›

Parents of Suicidal Teens Say They Feel Alone. Here Are Resources to Help.

When I wrote about my son’s depression and suicidal ideation, I was afraid to read the comments. I expected the Internet to tell me what I still feared deep down: it was all my fault.

What I received instead was a flurry of messages from mothers all around the country. These women didn’t contact me to criticize or accuse me, and none of them wanted to tell me what I could’ve done better for my son. Every woman who reached out to me did so with a single unifying message: “I felt like I was the only one.” Read more ›

How to Talk to Children and Teens About Suicide: A Guide for Parents

Suicide is the second-leading cause of death for adolescents. The social and academic stresses of these years, combined with the availability of alcohol and drugs and the effect of social media, leave many parents concerned about the mental well-being of their children. Read more ›

Opinion: Dialectical Behavioral Therapy Is Helping Young People Find Purpose During the Pandemic

During my nearly 15 years as an adolescent psychiatrist, I have worked with hundreds of young people and their families seeking a path to mental health through problem-solving, relationship and communication tools—and when appropriate—medication. But, until last year, I had not seen hopelessness so prevalent in young people. Read more ›

Talk About Mental Health: For Friends and Family Members

Anyone can experience mental health problems. Friends and family members can make all the difference in a person’s recovery process. Learn how to support your friends and loved ones with mental health problems. Read more ›

MentalHealthLiteracy.org [web resource]

MentalHealthLiteracy.org is non profit organization that creates educational, training, and clinical care materials and programs designed for use in schools and care settings to promote mental health literacy, clinical care capacity, self-care and psychoeducation, and evaluation of existing programs and interventions.

Mental health information (products and training programs) are designed to address the needs of youth ages 12 to 25 years, families, educators, health providers, policy makers and others. Read more ›

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