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Resources Tagged With: dyslexia

Could Your Child Have a Learning Difference?

Does your child have difficulty following directions, struggle with organization, or have trouble focusing on and completing schoolwork?  The following checklist can help you determine whether your child may have a learning difference. Read more ›

Gifted and Dyslexic: Identifying and Instructing the Twice Exceptional Student [downloadable]

As individuals, each of us has a unique combination of strengths and weaknesses. But sometimes we are exceptionally strong or weak in certain areas. In the school setting, students with exceptional strengths and weaknesses may have different instructional needs than other students. Twice exceptional or 2e is a term used to describe students who are both intellectually gifted (as determined by an accepted standardized assessment) and learning disabled, which includes students with dyslexia. Read more ›

What Does Twice Exceptional Mean? Identifying and Nurturing Gifted Children with ADHD

“Twice exceptional” (2e) is the term used to describe intellectually gifted children with great potential for academic achievement who also have a learning disability or neurological challenge, like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or ADD). Their exceptional intellectual abilities of 2e students are often masked or obscured by one or several conditions (or vice versa), making them one of the least recognized and supported populations. Read more ›

Translating Dyslexia Support to Distance Learning a Challenge, but Not Impossible

Dyslexia interventions can be replicated virtually with online sensory tools and assistive technology, District Administration reports, noting applications that allow for interactive learning also help students engage in distance learning environments. Read more ›

Understanding Dyslexia

Children each learn and develop at their own pace, and reading is no different from other skill building. It’s common for kids to find reading challenging at one point or another. But if learning to read becomes an ongoing struggle that leaves a child falling behind his peers, it’s possible that he has a learning disorder known as dyslexia. Read more ›

Inside an Evaluation for Learning Disorders [video]

When a child is struggling in school, the first step to finding help is figuring out what’s getting in his way. As a starting point, you need an evaluation of your child’s learning profile, to identify strengths and weaknesses, and suggest what kind of support he might need to thrive. Read more ›

Book: The Dyslexic Advantage

In their book The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain, learning disabilities specialists Fernette and Brock Eide explain how 20% of people—individuals with dyslexia—share a unique learning style that can create advantages in a classroom, at a job, or at home. Read more ›

The Gifts and Challenges of Dyslexia and ADHD – Resources from the 2020 CHC Breakfast

The CHC Breakfast 2020Dyslexia and ADHD present some of the greatest challenges for our children and teens— and also provide gifts beyond our imagination. Let us discover our strengths and embrace neurodiversity as a culture. The resources below will support you in continuing to building a community that celebrates difference as strength. Read more ›

Keeping Up in School? Identifying Learning Problems

Reading, writing, and math are the building blocks of learning. Mastering these subjects early on can affect many areas of life, including school, work, and even overall health. It’s normal to make mistakes and even struggle a little when learning new things. But repeated, long-lasting problems may be a sign of a learning disability. Read more ›

Raising Kids with Dyslexia: Advice from a Mom on a Mission

written by Liza Bennigson, Associate Director of Marketing and Communications

When her son, Dylan, was struggling with reading in second grade, Melinda Saunders thought little of it. After all, her older daughter, Alison, had been a late-reader, and Melinda knew every child learns at their own pace. Read more ›

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