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CHC Expert Blog

(More) Thoughts From My Garage

Written by Ramsey Khasho, PsyD

It’s been two months. 8 weeks. 56 days. Depending on how you’re keeping track.

You’d think things would have gotten easier by now. That we’d be better at sheltering-in-place, have become accustomed to staying home, come to terms with missed milestones and accepted our limited freedom. Read more ›

Is This Normal? Top 5 Things to Know About Your Young Child’s Development

Written by Melanie Hsu, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist and Early Childhood Program Manager at CHC

Many parents note that one silver lining of these scary and unprecedented times is the opportunity to spend much more time with their children. However, this increased attention can sometimes lead to more worries: is my child delayed? Are they reacting to the anxiety of these times? Or am I just more concerned and sensitive because of my own personal stress? Read more ›

Wise Words from Winnie the Pooh

Written by Cindy Lopez, Director, Community Connections

I have always been a big fan of Winnie the Pooh—so much wisdom and inspiration from a stuffed bear.

Here are some lessons from that bear—which one means the most to you? Read more ›

Thoughts From My Garage

Written by Ramsey Khasho, PsyD

It’s our eleventh day of “shelter-in-place.”

I’m working remotely from my garage, a makeshift office comprised of a dining room chair, portable folding table and a laptop. My wife, who is not a teacher, is in the house helping our three kids “distance learn,” trying to get them to focus on fractions and word problems. Read more ›

Why DBT Works

Written by Jennifer Leydecker, LMFT, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

In May of 2017, CHC opened its doors to RISE, an Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) for teens ages 13-18 who have suicidal thoughts/behaviors, recently attempted suicide, and/or repetitively engage in self-harm behaviors. In 2018, CHC joined forces with Stanford Children’s Health to increase capacity and complement expertise. Read more ›

Raising Kids with Dyslexia: Advice from a Mom on a Mission

written by Liza Bennigson, Content Marketing Manager CHC

When her son, Dylan, was struggling with reading in second grade, Melinda Saunders thought little of it. After all, her older daughter, Alison, had been a late-reader, and Melinda knew every child learns at their own pace. Read more ›

Does My Child Need Occupational Therapy (OT)?

Written by Vibha Pathak, Occupational Therapist, OTD, OTR/L

Every morning Marsha, age 10, wakes up on the wrong side of the bed and it is a battle to get to school on time.

After multiple reminders to brush her teeth, change her clothes, eat her breakfast and pack her school bag, Marsha drags her feet and asks her mom if she can stay home today. Read more ›

Anxiety and Twice Exceptional (2e) Child [downloadable]

Students who are twice-exceptional (2e) have tremendous intellectual gifts alongside a wide range of possible learning challenges — attention differences, slow processing speed, social immaturity, and/or weak executive function skills, just to name a few of the possibilities. Read more ›

Parenting with C.A.L.M.

Written by Joan Baran, PhD, Clinical Director at CHC

When we think of teens maturing, we think of all the changes they are going through: bodies growing, thinking becoming more abstract, and peers’ views considered increasingly important. Read more ›

When Does Disruptive Behavior Merit a Mental Health Diagnosis?

Written by Alexa Boubalos, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner at CHC

Explosive behavior. Rage. Tantrums. Meltdowns. Aggression. Property destruction.

Having a child with any of these behaviors can be a challenging experience. And while all children tend to act out from time to time, children with disruptive behavior disorders have persistent patterns of behavioral challenges that occur across settings and are much more extreme than other kids their age. Read more ›

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