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Resources Tagged With: dysgraphia

What Does Twice Exceptional Mean? Identifying and Nurturing Gifted Children with ADHD

“Twice exceptional” (2e) is the term used to describe intellectually gifted children with great potential for academic achievement who also have a learning disability or neurological challenge, like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or ADD). Their exceptional intellectual abilities of 2e students are often masked or obscured by one or several conditions (or vice versa), making them one of the least recognized and supported populations. Read more ›

Keeping Up in School? Identifying Learning Problems

Reading, writing, and math are the building blocks of learning. Mastering these subjects early on can affect many areas of life, including school, work, and even overall health. It’s normal to make mistakes and even struggle a little when learning new things. But repeated, long-lasting problems may be a sign of a learning disability. Read more ›

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EdRev Expo 2019 Workshop: Improving Reading and Writing with Free Microsoft Learning Tools [presentation]

Did you know Microsoft has created free, accessible AT to support students who struggle with reading and writing?  Presenter Keri Chismar showcases how these learning tools can be used to support classroom engagement of reading and writing for users with learning differences such as dyslexia, dysgraphia, ADHD, emerging readers, or a combination of any of the broad range of unique student abilities. Read more ›

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Top 5 Reasons to Train Teachers About Dyslexia

dyslexiablog431Written by Lisa Parnello, Literacy Specialist & Wilson Credentialed Trainer

In a sea of professional development opportunities for teachers, how do you decide what’s most important for teachers to learn? What will make the biggest impact on the students? Read more ›

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A Conversation Guide for Using Terms like Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, and Dysgraphia [downloadable]

talking175Clear and effective communication between parents, educators, and other school professionals is critical to identifying and meeting the needs of students with specific learning disabilities (SLD). Read more ›

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Classroom Accommodations for Dysgraphia [downloadable]

Dysgraphia is a neurological disorder characterized by writing disabilities. In children, the disorder generally emerges when they are first introduced to writing.

For kids with dysgraphia, the effort of writing can get in the way of learning. Here’s a look at some classroom accommodations from Understood.org that can help kids with writing issues. Read more ›

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Marja Brandon’s Talk to Sand Hill School Students [video]

As someone who has dyslexia, ADD, and dysgraphia, Marja Brandon, Head of Woodland School in Portola Valley, California, is well versed when it comes to understanding learning differences.  Learn more about the trajectory of Marja’s journey, what she has experienced, and how she continually works through life’s adversities. Read more ›

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Signs of Common Learning Disabilities

learningdifferences304Many children have difficulty with reading, writing, or other learning-related tasks at some point, but this does not mean they have learning disabilities. A child with a learning disability often has several related signs, and these persist over time.

Each learning disability has its own signs. Also, not every person with a particular disability will have all of the signs of that disability. Read more ›

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How I Learned Not to Be “That Mom” — a Mother’s Experience Advocating for Her Child with a Learning Disability

AEV_HeadshotAmy Valentine is the director of the Foundation for Blended and Online Learning (now Future of School), and she previously served as executive director of three virtual schools in Colorado. In early 2016, Valentine’s son was diagnosed with dysgraphia, a learning disability similar to dyslexia.

This is a difficult situation for a school, especially pre-diagnosis. As Valentine explains, “Post-diagnosis, though, there is support available for students who struggle to overcome a learning disability, from individual education plans to resource teachers and and technology assists. For my son, however, these tools did not materialize.” Read more ›

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Center for Parent Information and Resources [web resource]

CPIR logoThe Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR) serves as a central resource of information and products to the community of Parent Training Information (PTI) Centers and the Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRCs) so that they can focus their efforts on serving families of children with disabilities. Read more ›

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